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Full text of "Emblem"

EMBLEM 
1934 




THE 
EMBLEM 




7*69 



CHICAGO 

NORMAL COLLEGE 

1934 



CONTENTS 



DEDICATION 
CAMPUS 

ADMINISTRATION 
SENIORS 

FEBRUARY 
JUNE 

NOVEMBER 
APRIL 

CLASSES 

UPPER JUNIORS 
LOWER JUNIORS 
UPPER FRESHMEN 
LOWER FRESHMEN 

ACTIVITIES 

ORGANIZATIONS 
CLUBS 

ATHLETICS 

WOMEN'S 
MEN'S 

FEATURES 

HUMOR 

ADVERTISING 




DEDICATION 

This book of service we dedicate to one whose 
cooperation and enthusiasm have made possible 
the success of our class activities; whose sympathy 
with our ideals has made our college years rich 
and happy; whose friendship to us has been an 
inspiration ... to our adviser 

DOROTHY E. WILLY 



CAMPUS 




Sunshine and June 







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Winter's Mantle 




Stairway, Front Corridor 




Greenhouse 




Lengthening Shadows 



ADMINISTRATION 








THE FACULTY 

Butler Laughlin, President Emma Fleer Muller, Dean 

William C. Wilson 



Edwin Brye 
Denton L. Ceyer 
Grace E. Munson 



EDUCATION AND PSYCHOLOGY 
John J. DeBoer 
Willard C. Gore 



Elvira D. Cabell 
W. Wilbur Hatfield 

Agnes E. Doyle 
Jean Hutchison 

Frank X. Henke 
tEllen M. Olson 

Edgar C. Hinkle 

tAlice L. Garthe 

Gertrude Byrne 
Joseph Kripner 

Mary P. Blount 
Grant Smith 

Fred K. Branom 



ENGLISH 



GRAPHIC ART 



INDUSTRIAL ART 
Louis V. Newkirk 
KINDERGARTEN 



MATHEMATICS 
^John T. Johnson 

MUSIC 
Louise M. Gildemeister 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

^Nellie B. Cochran 

Louise Robinson 

SCIENCE 
Mary E. Freeman 

SOCIAL STUDIES 
George H. Gaston 
Lucie H. Schacht 



Sol R. Eilert 
Marie Hallinan 
Russell L. Wise 

Sophia C. Camenisch 
Louise M. Jacobs 

Henry G. Geilen 
Elmer A. Morrow 

^William G. Wilson 

Dorothy E. Willy 

Orion M. Miller 

Frances Peickert 

James J. Griffin 
Augusta A. Swawite 

Earl E. Sherff 
John H. Whitten 

Ross Herr 



Page Twelve 




John ). DeBoer, Supervisor of Practice Students 
Grace E. Munson, Supervisor of Cadets 

FACULTY OF LEAVE OF ABSENCE TEACHERS 

George C. Atterberry John A. Bartky Beulah Berolzheimer 

Vernon L. Bowyer Milton J. Cohler Elzy F. Downey 

Josiah L. Geist Clarence W. Gifford 

Daniel Hannan William L Kaiser 

James B. Parsons George C. Phipps 

Elmer C. Stauffer Catherine M. Taheny 
Horace Williston 



Mary C. Gillies 

Lucile H. Newkirk 

Andrew Stauffer 

Eloise S. Thetford 



Flora J. Bates 

Elizabeth Bennema 
Mabel T. Lulu 

: Head of Department 



LIBRARIANS 



CLERKS 
Catherine Conner 
Anna B. Otto 



Lorene Johnstone 



Veronica Dilzer 
Margaret S. McMahon 



±Acting Head of Department 



^ * ^ ^ I!©© > 



Page Thirte 



O SENIOR 

When the path of life grows narrow, 
And the lights beyond grow dim; 
When ambition clouds with sorrow. 
Then is the time to fight and win. 

When life seems full of failures 
Crushing the fair hopes of youth 
Push on! Be not in soul deceived. 
Stand up. Face facts, and seek the truth. 

When the day is over-shadowed 
And success is checked by doubt, 
Lose not your courage in despairing. 
Press on. High aim will bring you out. 

And when your path seems roughest 
And the light begins 1 to fade, 
Remember that — you'll be rewarded 
With the richness of life you've made. 

— Betty Harnden. 



SENIORS 



* Jti 



CLASS OF FEBRUARY 1934 



OFFICERS 

President Mary Corcoran 

Vice-President - - Bessie Finkel 

Secretary - Mary Riordan 

Treasurer Zelda Tanzer 



COLORS 
Creen and White 



GIFT 

The Murals 



ADVISERS 
Miss Peickert 
Miss Garthe 
Miss Cabell 



T-::r Sixteen 



VIOLA ADAMOWSKI, 623 
Jr. Choir 1. 2; Geography 4; 
Cui Bono 3-6; Foreign Cul- 
ture 5. 6; Polish. Vice-Pres. 
4; Baseball 1 . 3, Capt. I ; 
Soccer 2. 4: Captain Ball 2; 
Volley Ball 3. 



ALICE BLACK, 623 

Class Office Com. Chrm. 5. 6: 
High School Day Com. 2; St. 
Coun. Assembly Com. 5; 
Geography 4-6; Volley 



5; Capta 



Ball 



HELEN BRACHTL, 622 
Class Sec. 3. 4; Commence- 
ment Day Chrm. 5. 6; Section 
Chrm. I, 2; Hall Duty Com. 
4; Bulletin Bd. Com. 2; St. 
Coun. Publicity Com. 
Lunchroom Com. 5; 
Program Com. 1, 2; Fellow- 
ship Sec. 6; Normalite 3. 4; 
|r. Choir 1; Geography 1-5; 
Little Theatre 3, 4; Cui Bono 
5, 6; Camera 5; Poetry 2; 
Captain Ball 6. 

JEAN CARMICHAEL, 622 
Day Chrm. 5, 



Class 



Chn 



3; Ex 



diciary 5; Bulletin Bd. Com 
Chrm. 2; Class Publicity Com 
I, 2; Fellowship Social Com 
Chrm. 6; Geography 2-4; Cu 
Bono 3-6; Art Guild 3 
Poetry I ; Baseball 1 ; Volley 
Ball 1,3; Captain Ball 6. 

ROSEMARY COMERFORD, 
623 

Fellowship Rose Sale Com. 2; 
W. A. A. Rep. I ; Jr. Cho r 
1. 3; Geography 3, 4; Art 
Guild 2; Poetry 4. 



MARY CORCORAN, 622 
Class Pres. 6; Section Chrm. 
2; Executive judiciary 3; St. 
Coun. Nominating Com. 6; 
Lunchroom Com. 2; Class 
Social Com. Chrm. 3. 4; 
Usher 4; )r. Choir I; Geog- 
raphy 3; Baseball 1 ; Volley 
Ball 1; Soccer 2; Captain 
Ball 6. 



MARIE DEAN, 623 

Fellowship Rep. 5. 6; Rose 
Sale Com. 3; |r. Choir 1.2; 
Geography 1-5; Art Guild 
1-6; Poetry 3. 4, Pres. 5, 6. 





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VIRGINIA DYSON, 623 
Class Day Com. 5, 6; St. 
Coun. Publicity Com. 5; Class 
Social Com. 1, 2. Nominating 
Com. 1, Publicity Com. 3, 4; 
Fellowship Refreshment Com 
3; Geography 4-6; Cui Bono 
4-6; Foreign Culture 5. 6; 
Dance 6; Baseball 1, 3; Vol 
ley Bail 1,3, 5; Soccer 2, 4; 
Captain Ball 2, 4. 



LUCY HARD, 622 

Class Program Com. Chrm 
5. 6; Class Song Com. 5. 6, 



JANE HOLMAN, 622 



Ctm 



s 






ity Girls' Confer- 
ence Delegate 4; Commence- 
ment Ticket Taker 4; Nor- 
malite 1-5. News Ed. 3. 
Ed. -in-Chief 4; Geography 2. 
4; Cui Bono 4, 6; Art Guild 
3; Sketch 6; Baseball 1 ; Vol- 
ley Ball I ; Soccer Capt. 2. 

CATHERINE JONES, 623 

Cap and Gown Com. Chrm. 
5, 6; Section Chrm. 5, 6; 
St. Coun. Auditing Com. 6. 
Assembly Com. 4; Class Social 
Com. 1, 2, Program Com. 3, 
4 1 Usher 5; Fellowship Serv- 
ice Com. 5; W. A. A. Rep. 

1, Board 2; Geography 1-5. 
Vice-Pres. 2; Little Theatre 

2. 3. Pres. 4, 5; Cui Bono 
4. 5; Baseball 1, 2; Volley 
Ball I, 3, Capt. 5; Soccer 2. 
4; Captain Ball 2, All Star 
6; Swimming 3. 

HYMAN KAPLAN, 623 

M. A. A. 1-6; Orchestra 3, 
4; Men's Chorus 1.2; Foot- 
ball. I, 2, 6; Track 1-6. 

MARJORIE LINTINC, 623 

Class Treas. 1,2; Class Day 
Com. 5, 6; Class Publicity 
Com. 3, 4; Geography 4-6; 
Cui Bono 4-6; Foreign Cul- 
ture 5, 6; Dance 6; Baseball 

I, 3; Volley Ball 1, 3, 5; 

Soccer 2. 4; Captain Ball 2. 



MARY LISCHALK, 623 
Pin and Ring Com. 5, 6; 
Geography 5; Sketch 5; Cap- 



Pfigc Seventeet 



MARY MATTOON, 622 
Class Social Com. 4. Song 
Com. Chrm. 5. 6; Usher 4. 
Special Choir 1-6; Geography 
4: Cui Bono 4-6. 



VIRGINIA PANICI. 623 
Pin and Ring Com. 5. I 
Class Song Com. 5. 6; Geoi 
raphy 5. 6; Cui Bono ! 
Sketch 4, 5; Foreign Cultu 
5 6' Dance 6; Volley B; 
3. 5; Soccer 2. 4; Capta 
Ball 2. 6. 



ELSA PETERSEN, 623 

Geography 3. 4; Cui Bono 3. 
4; Baseball 3: Volley Ball 4; 



LILLIAN RAINS, 622 

Class Song Com. 5. 6; Fel- 
lowship Rep. 2, 3. 6; |r. Choir 
I; Geography I, 4; Little 
Theatre 2. 3; Art Guild 5. 6; 
Sketch 4-6. 



MARY RIORDAN, 622 
Class Sec. 5. 6; Section O 



Class Consti 
Soci; " 



Chin 



Chn 



Soccer 2; Cap- 



Nominating Com. 
1 Publicity Com. i_nrm. 3, t. 
Usher 4; Fellowship Rep. 4; 
W. A. A. Rep. 4; Geography 
2-4; Cui Bono 4, 6; Art Guild 
3; Poetry 1 
ley Ball 1. i 
tain Ball 2. 6. 

MIRIAM ROSEN, 622 

Geography 2-4; Little Theatr 
1,4; Cui Bono 4-6. 



LILLIAN SEIFERT, 622 
Cap and Gown Com. 5, 6; 
Fellowship Social Com. 2-4, 
Rep. 5; Geography 1-5; Cui 
Bono 4-6; Avukah 5. 6; Vol- 
ley Ball 3; Captain Ball 2. 6. 
Capt. 2. 



¥kS 



LILLIE SHKOLER, 622 

Geography 4; Little Theatre 1 



SARAH SILVERMAN, 622 
Geography 3, 4; Little Thea- 



EDITH SPELLENBERC, 622 
Class Office Com. 5. 6; Sec- 
tion Chrm. 3. 4; St. Coun. 
Nominating Com. 3 ; Student 
Service Com. 3; High School 
Day Com. 3; Emblem Rep. 1 ; 
Geography 4; Cui Bono 4-6; 
Art Chrm. Spring Festival. 
Christmas Festival 6; Sketch 
3-6; Baseball 1, 3; Volley 
Ball 1, 3, 5; Soccer 2, 4; 
Captain Ball 2, 6. 

SARAH STACMAN, 622 

Pin and Rng Com. Chrm. 5, 



jkah 5. 6; Volley Ball 3. 



ANN SUCHANEK, 622 

Bulletin Bd. Com. 4; Class 
Auditing Com. 1, 2; Com- 
mencement Ticket Taker 4; 
Normalite 1-4, Feature Ed. 
3; Geography 2, 3; Cui Bono 



ZELDA TANZER, 622 

Class Treas. 6; Class Prograr 
Com. 3-5; Geography 1-4 
Little Theatre 4; Volley Ba 
I, 3. Capt. 1. 



ACNES VIALL, 622 

Class Vice-Pres. 1, 2; An- 
nouncements Com. Chrm. 5. 
6' Section Chrm. 2; Girls' 
Room Com. 2, 3; Charity 
Com. 1 ; High School Day 
Com. 2; Class Newspaper 
Ass't. Ed. 3; Usher 4; Stu- 
dent Adviser 6; Fellowship 
Fudge Sale Com. Chrm. 6; 
Jr. Choir 1, Vice-Pres. 2; 
Geography 2-5; Cui Bono 4, 
5, Pres. 6; Art Guild 2-6. 
Vice-Pres. 3; Poetry 3-5. 
Sec. 4. 



Page Eighteen 



MAE WILLIAMSON, 622 



Pres. 3; Geography 4, 5: 
Volley Ball I, Capt. 3. Soccer 
2; Captain Ball 2. 



i 



Marianne Boeticher, 62 
Esther Browne, 622 
Marjorie Burnett, KG6 
Verda R. Churchill, FT 
Margaret V. Davis, FT 
Beatrice Felt, 700 



OTHER GRADUATES 
Bessie Finkel, 622 
Geraldine Gray, 623 
Camille Hamilton, FT 
Lucille Hanley, KG6 
Helen Housler, 623 
Margaret Mulvihill, 700 
Helen H. McFadden, FT 



Margaret Myers, KG6 
Juanita Louise Parsons, 623 
Bernard Quish, 622 
Rose Schultz, 622 
Minnie Vonderheidt, 700 
Josephine Wall, KG6 



Grace Carroll, UT 
Genevieve Fahey, UT 
Henry Freeberg, 700 



APRIL 1934 
Dorothy Holmes, 700 
Louise Mary Hynes, UT 
Evelyn lllion, 700 



Marcella McGoldrick, 700 
Therese M. McNellis, 634 
Catheryn j. Roach, UT 



Mildred Gustafson, UT Mary Margaret Ley, 700 Marion C. Smith, UT 



Page Nineteen 




CLASS OF JUNE 1934 

OFFICERS 

President Helen Zimmerman 

Vice-President Esther Mies 

Secretary Emily Flosi 

Treasurer Sam Wallace 

Sergeant-at-arms Ruth Lundgren 

COLORS 
Green and Silver 

PLATFORM 
Campus Beautiful 

GIFT 
Women's Lounge Fund 



ADVISERS 

Miss Willy 
MissCarthe 
Miss Freeman 
Mr. Herr 
Mr. Gaston 



/'"//' Tin III n 



WESLEY AMAR, 700 



HELEN ANDERSON, 63-4 



Emblem. Art 6; 


Geography 


1-3, 


Vice-Pres. 




Little 


Theat 


e, 1, 3, 4 


(.111 




2. 3; 


Sketch 1-6 


Soc 




Lapta 


n Ball 1. 







IEANETTE ANDERSON, 634 
Class Nominating Com. 1 ; 
Special Choir 2, 3; Geography 
2, 4; Cui Bono, 2, 3; Dance 
I ; Soccer 1 ; Volley Ball 2. 



FLORENCE ARMIN, 632 
Fellowship Rep. 1-6; Nor- 
malite 6; |r. Choir 1, 2; 
Geography 3-5; Soccer I; 
Captain Ball 1 ; Baseball 2. 



LILLIAN ASTRACHAN, 633 
Special Choir 3-6; Geography 
4; Little Theatre 4; Art 
Guild 2, 3; Poetry 1; Avukah 
Executive Com. 3. 4; Volley 



MILDRED BACY, 634 

Pin and Ring Com. 5, 6 
Emblem. Co-Ed. Humor 6 
Fellowship Rep. 4; Normalit 
4-6; Geography 1-4; Littl 
Theatre 3. 4; Cui Bono 3 
Creative Writing 3, 4; Soccc 
I, 3; Baseball 2, 4; Voile 



EILEEN BAINE. 633 

Geography 1-4; Art Gui 
Sketch 2-5; Baseball 2; 
ley Ball 4. 6. 



5 

1 


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1 


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f 




A , V.' 




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lad? 


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VIRGINIA BLYTH, 635 
Girls' Room Com. 3; Health 
Com. 5; Geography 2, 4. 
Poetry 2; Dance 1. 



MARIE BRENNAN, 635 
Cap and Gown Com. 5. 6; 
Hall Duty Com. 5; Class 
Auditing Com. 3, 4; Jr. Choir 
1. 2; Geography 1. 2, 4; 
Camera 3, 4; Math. 6; Soccer 
1 ; Captain Ball 1 ; Baseball 
2; Volley Ball 2. 



ELIZABETH BROWNING, 
KC6 
Class Nominating Com. 1, 2, 
Chrm. 4; Fellowship Rep. 
1-5. Election Com. Chrm. 5; 
W. A. A. Rep. 6; Kg-Primary 
1-6; Art Guild 4, 5: Camera 

4, 5, 6; Dance 1, 2, 3. 

JAMES BURD, 632 

Commencement Day Chrm. 

5. 6; St. Coun. Publicity 
Com. Chrm. 3; St. Coun. 
Auditing Com. 2; Mens' 
Room Com. 3; Class Publicity 
Com. 4; Class Auditing Com. 
Chrm. 1, 2; Class Publication 
Com. 3; Normalite Feature 
Ed. 3, 5, Club Ed. 4, Ed. -in- 
Chief 6; Men's Chorus 1; 
Geography 1, Treas. 2; Cui 
Bono 4, Sec. -Treas. 5, 6. 

BETTY BUTLER, 635 

Class Social Com. 5, 6; Nor- 
malite 2; Geography 1-4; 
Cui Bono 4-6; Camera 3. 4; 
Math. 6; Soccer 1. 3; Cap- 
tain Ball 1. 5; Baseball 2; 
Volley Ball 2, 4; Swimming 4. 



EVELYN BUZA, 632 
Geography 4; Dance 
Soccer 1 ; Captain B 
Baseball 2; Volley Bat 



EILEEN CASEY, 634 

Cap and Gown Com. 5, 6; 
Student Daily Com. Chrm. 5; 
Girls' Room Com, 4; Emblem. 
Co-Ed. Humor 6; Fellowship 
Rep. 1 ; Fudge Sale Com. 1 ; 
Normalite 2-6; Geography 4; 
Little Theatre 1 -4; Soccer 3. 
5; Captain Ball 1.3: Base- 
ball 2, 4; Volley Ball 4; 
Swimming 4; Bowling 2. 



Page Twenty- 



MARIE CASEY, 634 

Normalite 1-6, Geography 



VALLI CASEY, 632 

Fellowship Service Com. 4; 
Ceography 1-4; Sketch 2-6; 
Art Guild 2-6; Little Theatre 
1 ; Cui Bono 4-6; Dance 1 ; 
Soccer 1 ; Captain Ball 1 ; 
Baseball 2. 



DOROTHY CHESLER, 634 



ss Publicity Com. 5. 6 
alite 1 , 2; Special Choir 
Geography 2, 3; Littk 



Theatre 3-5; Cl 



AMY CLARAS, 635 

Class Day Stunt Com 5. 6; 
Section Chrm. 5, 6; Hall 
Duty Com. 3; Girls' Room 
Com. Chrm. 5; Jr. Choir 1-5; 
Geography 2. 4; Little Thea- 
tre 2; Cui Bono 5; Art 
Guild 3, 4; Soccer 3; Captain 
Ball 3, 5; Volley Ball 4. 



HELEN COLLINS, 632 

Class Auditing Com. 2; Stu- 
dent Adviser 6; Geography 
3, 4; Little Theatre 1, 2; 
Cui Bono 4-6; Sketch 2-5 
Art Cuild 2-5; Dance 1; 
Soccer 1 ; Captain Ball 1 ; 
Baseball 2; Volley Ball 2. 



MARGARET CONDON, KC6 
Prom Arrangements Com. 
Chrm. 5, 6; Section Chrm. 
1,2; Bulletin Bd. Com. Chrm 
5; St. Coun. Publicity Com 
Chrm. 5; Class Auditing Com 
3, 4; Fellowship Treas. 5; 
Rose Sale Com. 3; Kg-Pnmary 
1-6. Treas. 3. 4; Jr. Choir 
1. 2; Geography 1, 2; Little 
Theatre 3, Sec. 4; Art Guild 
Captain Ball 1. 



3-6; Socc 



ROSALIND CONLEY, 632 



I* 



FRANCES DAVEY, 632 
Hall Duty Com. 3; Lunchroom 
Com. 6; Girls' Room Com. 2; 
Student Service Com. 2, 3, 6, 
Chrm. 3; Big Sister Party 
Com. 3; Class Printing Com 
5. 6; Special Choir 1-6; 
Geography 4; Little Theatre 
4; Cui Bono 4-6; Dance 2. 



EVELYN DAVIDSON, KC6 
Section Chrm. 5; Kg-Priman 
1-6; Geography 3-5; Camer; 
5, 6; Mask 6; Poetry 1-3. 



MARIORIE DELANEY, 632 
Class Constitutional Com. 
Chrm. 1 ; Geography 4; Art 
Cuild 2; Poetry I. 



DOROTHY DIETRICK, 634 
Section Chrm. 1. 2; Student 
Daily Com. 3; Bulletin Bd. 
Com .3; Girls' Room Com. 
2, 3; St. Coun. Auditing 
Com. 3; Ceography 1-5; Cui 
Bono 3; Jr. Choir 1, 2. 



DOROTHY DODGE, KG6 

High School Day 



Socii 



Chn 



4; W. 



6; Class Progr, 

Rose Sale Com 

Rep. 3, 4; Kg-Pnmary 1-6; 

Jr. Choir 1; Geography 1-5; 

Little Theatre 2-4; Art Guild 

2-4; Soccer All Star 1 , 

Hockey 1 . 



MARY DONOGHUE, 633 

Class Nominating Com. 2; , 
Choir 1 ; Geography 1 , 
Sketch 4; Art Guild 3. 
Clay Modeling 2. 



MARY DRAINE. 632 

Executive Judiciary Com. 2; 
Bulletin Bd. Com. 4; Book 
Exchange Com. 2, 3; Class 
Oftice Com. Chrm. 5, 6; Em- 
blem Statf Typist 6; Jr. Choir 
Vice-Pres. 2; Geography 3. 4; 
Art Guild 4. 



Page Twenty-two 



AGATHA DUNNE, 632 
Jr. Choir I, 2; Geograph* 
2-4; Art Guild 4; Soccer I; 
Captain Ball 1. Baseball 2. 
Volley Ball 2. 



FLORENCE DURKIN. KC6 



MARGARET DWYER 633 
Cap and Gown Com. 5. C 
Section Chrm. 1. 2; Studer 
Adviser 6: Rose Sale Com. - 
|r. Choir 1 ; Geography 4; Ai 
Cuild 4; Sketch 3. 



DOROTHY EIRICH, 635 
Section Chrm. 3. 4; Normalitc 
1-4. Club Ed. 5, 6; Cui Bono 



WINIFRED ERICKSON, 634 
Prom Publicity Com. Chrm 
5, 6; Class Nominating Com. 
Chrm. t ; Emblem Co-Ed. 5. 
6; Fellowship Refreshment 
Com. 3: Normalite Exchange 
Ed. 1, Club Ed. 2. 3. News 
Ed. 4. Ed. -in-Chief 5 
Bono 3-5; Soccer 1,3; Cap 
tain Ball 5; Baseball 2; Vol 
ley Ball 4; Bowling 2. 



Cui 



LUCILE FAIRBAIRN, 632 

Queen of the May 6; Class 
Social Com. 5. 6; Jr. Choir 
1, 2; Geography 1-4; Art 
Guild 4; Soccer; Captain Ball 
1 : Baseball 2. 



IRENE FERMIER, 633 

Prom Music Com. 5. 6; Social 
Hr. Com. Chrm. 6; Class Pro- 
gram Com. 2; Class Music 
Com. 2-4; Emblem, Freshman 
Features Ed. 6; Usher 4, 5; 
Normalite 3-6: Geography 3. 
4; Little Theatre 3, 4; Poetry 
2; Soccer 1, 3; Captain Ball 
1, 3; Baseball 2. 6; Vo'ley 
Ball 2, 4. 6, Capt. 2; Tennis 
3. 4. 6. 





m 


Hl ■ r - MM 
W 





MARY FINAN, 635 

Tickets and Announcements 
Com. Chrm. 5. 6; Social Hr. 
Com. 4. Chrm. 5; Class Pub- 
licity Com. 3. 4; Fellowship 
Social Com. Chrm. 4; Nor- 
malite 1-3; Special Choir 2. 
3; Geography 1-4; Cui Bono 
4; Christmas Festival Chrm 
5; Soccer I, 3; Captain Ball 
1. 3. 5; Baseball 2. 4; Volley 
Ball 2, 4; Swimming 2. 3. 

MARY FITZGERALD, 632 



p 


n and Ring Com. 5. 6 


; Sec- 






. 2; Class 


Social 


c 


m. 3. 4; 


Fellowship 


Rep. 


2 


|r. Choi 


1, 2, Pres. 1 ; 


Geography 


1-4; Cui 






6; Sketch 


3, 4; Art 


Guild 




Soccer 1 


Captain B 




S 


ar 1 ; Baseball 2; 


Volley 


Ball 2. 






EM 


LY FLOS 


1, 635 




c 


ass Sec. 5 


6; Student 


Serv- 




e Com. 3; 


Class Music 


Com. 


3 


4; Specia 


Choir 2-4 


Vice- 


P 


es. 6; Jr. 


Choir 1 ; 


Geog- 




phy 1-6. 


Sec. 3; Cu 


Bono 


4 


6; Soccer 


. 3; Capta 


n Ball 


3 


5; Baseball 2; Volley Ball 


2 


4; Tenn 


s 3-5. 





LORETTA FRANCIS, 633 
Jr. Choir I, 2; Geography 
1-4; Art Guild 2; Creative 



VIRGINIA FRISBIE, 632 
5. 

Choir 



Art Guild 2. 



SYLVIA GOLDMAN, 634 



DOROTHY COLLER, KC6 

Prom Publicity Com. 5, 6; 
Hall Duty Com. 5; Social Hr. 
Com. 2; Student Service Com. 

3, 4; Lost and Found Com. 

4, 5; Class Program Com. 3. 
4; Rose Sale Com. 3; Fudge 
Sale Com. 4; Kg-Primary 1-6; 
Special Choir 3. 4; Jr. Choir 
I ; Geography 1 , 2; Little 
Theatre 3, 4; Cui Bono 4-6, 
Vice-Pres. 5; Art Guild 5. 6; 
Mask 5; Soccer All Star 1 ; 
Captain Ball 1 ; Volley Ball 
All Star 2; Tennis 1-3. 



Page Twenty-three 



GERTRUDE GRAF, KC6 



Sect 



Chr. 



Office Com. Chrm. 5. 6 
Fudge Sale Com. 3; W. A. A 
Rep. I; Kg-Primary 1-6; Spe 
cial Choir 5; Jr Choir 1 
Geography 1 ; Soccer All Star 
Captain Ball 1 ; Baseball 2 
Volley Ball 2. 

EDITH CRAY, 632 

Geography 2-4. 

MARIE HAHN. 634 

Class Day Luncheon Arrange- 
ments Com. 5. 6; Class Social 
Com. 3, 4; Student Adviser 
5; Fellowship Rep. 5, 6: 
Normalite 4. 5; Piano Meth- 
ods I, 2; Geography 1, 3, 4; 
Little Theatre 3. 4. Cui Bono 
3-5: Soccer 1, 3; Captain 
Ball 1 ; Baseball 2; Volley Ball 

2. 4. 

ALICE HANSON, 633 

Prom Invitations and Bids 
Com. 5, 6; Section Chrm. 3, 
4; St. Coun. Pres. 6; Nomi- 
nating Com. 4; Executive 
ludiciary 4; Class Program 
Com. 1. 2; Emblem. Features 
Ed. 6; Usher 4, 5; Rose Sale 
Com. 4; W. A. A. Rep. 6; 
Normalite t-6; Geography 
1-4. Vice-Pres. 2; Little 
Theatre 3. 4; Cui Bono 5; 
Art Guild 1-4: Soccer 1, 3; 
Captain Ball I, 3. Capt. 1 ; 
Baseball 2, 4; Volley Ball 2. 

4. 6; Tennis 2. 3. 

ETHEL HELANDER, 634 

Girls' Room Com. 4; Big Sis- 
ter Party Com 5: Class Pro- 
gram Com. 3. 4; Special Choir 

5. 6; Jr. Choir 2: Piano 
Methods 1.2; Geography 2-6. 
Treas. 5; Captain Ball I, 3, 
5. Capt. and All Star I ; Vol- 
ley Ball 2. 4. 

KATHERINE JANSSON, KC6 
Class Vice-Pres. 3, 4; Emblem 
Co-Ed. 5. 6; Class Day Lunch- 
eon Arrangements Com. Chrm. 
5. 6: St. Coun. Sec. 5; Exec- 
utive ludiciary 5; Class Pro- 
gram Com. Chrm. 1, 2; Class 
Nominating Com. 1 ; Fellow- 
ship Service Com. 4; Nor- 
malite 1. Copy Ed. 2-6; Kg- 
Primary 1-6; Jr. Choir 1; 
Geography 1-3; Little Theatre 

3, 4; Cui Bono 4-6; Sketch 
3-6; Art Guild 3-6; Soccer 
1 ; Captain Ball 1 ; Volley 
Ball 2; Hiking 5, 6. 

MARGARET KELLIHER, 632 
Class Nominating Com. 1,3; 
Class Auditing Com. 5, 6; 
Emblem, Copy Desk Ed. 6; 
Normalite 1 -4, Copy Ed. 5. 
6; Geography 4: Cui Bono 
4-6; Art Guild 4-6. 



k 'IP*- ^H 



CLARA KLOMHAUS, 635 
Section Chrm. 1, 2: Rose 
Sale Com. 3; Jr. Choir 4. 5; 
Geography 1, 3, 4; Soccer 1, 
3; Captain Ball 1, 3. 5: Base- 
ball 2, 4; Volley Ball 2. 4. 



ANGELA KNUDTZON, 632 
Class Day Stunt Com. 5, 6; 
Fellowship Rep. 3; Special 
Choir 5. 6; Geography 3. 4; 
Dance 1. 2; Soccer I ; Cap- 
tain Ball 1 ; Baseball 2; 
Volley Ball 2. 



HELEN KUCLIN, 635 

St. Coun. Vice-Pres. 5: Hall 
Duty Com. 3. 4; Class Pro- 
gram Com. 5. 6; Rose Sale 
Com 3; W. A. A. Sec. 3, 
Bowling Mgr. 2. Board 3. 
Rep. 4; Geography 2-6; Little 



Theatre 


4-6; Sketch 3 




; Captain Ball 


5; Voile 


y Ball 2, 4. 6; B 



MARGARET LALOR, 633 



: LEMMIE LANCIANESE. 
634 
Girls' Room Com. 5; Student 
Service Com. 2; Lost and 
Found Com. 1 ; Fellowship 
Treas. 4; W. A. A. Rep. 2, 
Ping Pong Mgr. 4, Vice- 
Pres. 5: Special Choir 3, 5, 
6; Jr. Choir 1, 2; Geography 
2-4; Little Theatre 2-4; Cui 
Bono 4, 5; Soccer 1, Capt 
3; Baseball Capt. 2. All Star 
4; Volley Ball 2. Capt. 4. 



LILLIAN LEHMAN, KC6 
Class Day Chrm. 5. 6; Sec- 
tion Chrm. 5, 6; Hall Duty 
Com. 3; Emblem, Photog- 
raphy Ed. 6: Student Advi- 
ser 5. 6; Normalite 4-6; 
Kg-Primary 1-6; Special Choir 
5; Jr. Choir 1; Geography 1. 
3; Cui Bono 4-6; Soccer 1; 
Tennis 2. 

DOROTHY LEMBACH, 635 



Class Pres. 3, 
Pres. 5; Nomir 
Charity Tea Com. 3; Fresh- 
man Tea Com. 3, Chrm. 4; 
Assembly Program Com. 3; 
Class Social Com. 1,2; Class 
Music Com. 1, 2. 5. 6; Or- 
chestra 3-6; Piano Methods 
I, 2; Geography 1-6, Pres. 
2; Cui Bono 4; Soccer 1, 3, 
All Star 1; Captain Ball I. 
3. 5; Baseball 2, 4; Volley 
Ball 2; Swimming 2. 



Page Twenty-foui 



CHARLOTTE LEVINSON, 
632 
Student Daily Com. 6; Gas 
Social Com. 1,2: Class Of tic. 
Com 5. 6. Emblem. Ass't 
Club Write-Up Ed. 6: No- 
malite 1 -4. News Ed 6 
Geography 4; Soccer I; Cap 
" Vol 



BETTY LIKAS. 634 

Social Hr. Com. 2. 3; Big 
Sister Party Arrangements 
Com Chrm. 4, Entertainment 
Com 5: Fellowship Rep. 5: 
W. A. A. Rep. 1 . Hike Mgr 
2. Board 3, Pres. 4, Swimming 
Mgr. 5: Special Choir 4-6: |r. 
Choir 2: Little Theatre 2-4; 
Cui Bono 3-5; Soccer 1 ; Cap- 
tain Ball 1 ; Baseball 2. All 



LEAH LINDENBERC, 635 

Student Service Com. 5. 6; 
Fellowship Rep. 3; |r. Choir 
1, 4; Geography 2. 4; Cui 
Bono 4-6: Avukah 5; Soccer 
3; Captain Ball I. 3, 5; 
Baseball. All Star 2. 4; Vol- 
ley Ball 2. 4. 

LILLIAN LIPOFSKY, 632 



LILLIAN LIPSCHULTZ, 633 

Section Chrm. 5; Class Pub- 
licity Com. 5. 6; Jr. Choir I ; 
Geography 4: Cui Bono 4, 5; 
Poetry I : Avukah 4, Execu- 
tive Com. 6; Soccer 1 ; Cap- 
tain Ball 1 : Baseball 2. 



ALVA LOVELESS, KC6 

Prom Music Com. 5. 6: Class 
Entertainment Com. 1, 2; 
Fudge Sale Com. 3; Kg-Pri- 
mary 1-6; )r. Choir 1; Geog- 
raphy 2; Sketch 5; Soccer 1 ; 
Captain Ball 1 : Baseball 2; 
Volley Ball 2. 



RUTH LUNDCREN, 635 

Class Sergt -at-Arms 5. 6: 
Social Hr. Com. 5; St. Coun 
Auditing Com. 5; Class Aud- 
iting Com. 3. 4; Fellowship 
Refreshment Com. 4; W.A.A 
Rep. 3; Normalite 3; |r. Cho'r 
4; Geography 2-4; Art Guild 
4; Poetry 1; Soccer 1, Capt 
3; Captain Ball 1 ; Baseball 2. 
All Star 4; Volley Ball. All 
Star and Capt. 2. 4. 6; Ten- 
nis 4. 5; Swimming 4. 5. 





l*# 


m 

4 f 



RITA MAHER, KC6 

Girls' Room Com. 3; Kg- 
Pnmary 1-6; Special Cho.r 
3. 4; |r. Choir 1. 2; Geog- 



FRED M. MANZ, 633 



MILDRED MARANO, 635 



6; Cui Bono 
3; Captain Bal 
ill 2; Volley B, 



MARY MATIASIC, 633 

Hall Duty Com. 2, Chrm. 4; 
Bulletin Bd. Com. Chrm. 3; 
Social Hr. Com. 6; Class Song 
Com. 2-4; Rose Sale Com. 4; 
W. A. A. Rep. 2; Special 
Choir 3-6; |r. Choir 
Geography 



Guild 2- 
Soccer 4; Captain Ball I, 
All Star 1 ; Baseball 2, 
Volley Ball 2. 4, 6. 



ROBERT McCANN, 632 
Class Sergt. -at-Arms 3. 4; 
Social Hr, Com. 3; Men's 
Room Com. 3; Class Social 
Com. 1, 2; Class Program 
Com. Chrm. 5, 6; Fellowship 
Treas. 6; Normalite Circula- 
tion Mgr 6; Men's Chorus 3, 
6; Geography 3. 4; Little 
Theatre 3. 



MARY McCULLOUCH. 634 
Class Treas. 1, 2; Section 



Class Publication Com. 3. 4; 

Class Printing Com. 5. 6; 

Horse Back Riding Mgr. 1. 

5; Geography 1-4. Pres. 3; 

Little Theatre 2; Cui Bono 4; 

Soccer 1. 3: Volley Ball 4; 
Archery 5, 6. 



mary McDonnell, 633 

Executive Judiciary Com. 1 : 
Class Nominating Com. 1 ; |r 
Choir 1 ; Geography 4; Little 
Theatre 3. Sketch 4, 5; 
Soccer I. Capt. 3; Volley 
Ball 2, 3. 



Page Twenty-five 



MARIE McKILLIP. KC6 
Tickets and Announcements 
Com. 5. 6: Bulletin Bd. Com 
5- Book Exchange Com. 3; 
St Coun. Publicity Com. 
Chrm 3; High School Day 
Com. 2; Kg-Pr.mary 1-6: Jr. 
Choir 1 ; Little Theatre 3. 4, 
Vice-Pres. 5; Cui Bono 4-6; 



carolyn Mclaughlin. 

KG6 
Class Muse Com. Chrm. 1 -( 
Fellowship Rsp. I . 2 • 
Fudge Sale Com 5; Kg-Pr 
mary 1-6; Orchestra 4-( 
Piano Methods I, 2. 

CATHERINE McNELLIS, 
634 



5. 6; Big Siste 



Party En 
Fel I o w 



Geography 2-4. S 
5- Little Theatre I, 3, 
Cui Bono 3. 4; Dance 
Soccer 3; Captain Ball 3 
Pa:eball 2, 4; Volley Ball 



ELEANOR MOORE. 633 
Fellowship Rep. 3, 4; |r Cho'r 



ELIZABETH MUELLER. 632 
Section Chrm. 5.^6; Book 
Exchange Com. 
Rep. 1 -6, Sec. 
Swimming 2-6. 

3-6; Jr. Choir 1, z; i_ui duo 
3-6; Foreign Culture 4; Soc- 
cer Caot. 1 . Captain Ball I 
Baseball Capt. 2; Volley Ball 
Capt. 2; Tennis 2. 4. 6. 



Pre 



Capt. 



MAE NEELY, 633 

Jr. Choir I, 2; Geography 4 
Cui Bono 4-6; Sketch 3. 5. 6 
Soccer 1.3; Captain Ball 5 
Baseball 2; Volley 



2, 4. 6. 



FRANCES NEITZ, 634 
Class Social Com. 5. 6 
Choir 1 ; Geography 3, 4 
Bono 5; Dance 2; Socc< 
Captain Ball 1 ; Baseba 
Volley Ball 2. 4. 



MILDRED NEUFFER. KC6 
Prom Publicity Com. 5. 



Son. 



5; Book Ex 



Com. 2. Chrm. 3; Health 
Com 3' Fellowship Ro:e Sale 
Com. 3. Publicity Com. 5. 
Fudge Sale Com. 4; Kg-Pri- 
mary 1-6. Sec. 2-4; Jr. Choir 
1 ; Geography 1 -3; Little 
Theatre 2-4; Sketch 3-5; Art 
Guild 4. 5; Soccer All Star 
1 ; Captain Ball 1 ; Baseball 
2; Volley Ball 2. 



ADELAIDE NICHOLS. 635 



MARGARET O'CONNELL, 
633 
Fellowship Rep. 1 ; |r. Choir 
1.2; Geography 1 ; Soccer 1 ; 
Captain Ball 1 ; Volley Ball 2. 



MARY O'CONNOR. 632 
Geography 4; Little Theatre 
1 ; Captain Ball All Star I. 



ESTHER PALLIN, 634 
Special Choir 6; Jr. Choi 
Geography 4; Dance. I. 



BEATRICE PENNINGTON, 
633 
Prom Arrangements Com. 5, 



6; Social 


Hr. Com. 3. 6; 


Bulletin 


3d. Com. 2; Girls' 


Room Co 


n. 6; Class Program 


Com. 3, 


4- Class Publicity 


Com. Ch 


m. 2; Usher 4. 5; 


W. A. A. 


Tennis Mgr. 3, Rep. 




Choir 3-6; Geog- 


raphy 4; 


Little Theatre 1 ; 


Soccer 3 


Captain Ball 1. 3. 


Baseball 


2 4; Volley Ball 2. 



HELEN PETERSON, 633 



Clas: 



Com. 



hrm. 5, 6; St. Coun. 

- Pres. 3. Nominating 
I 2; Bulletin Bd. Com. 

2; Chanty Com. Chrm. 
4- Freshman Tea Com. 6; 
Emblem. Senior Write-Up Ed. 
6; Usher 4. 5; All-City Girls 
Conference Del. 3. Sec. 3. 4; 
Student Adviser 4; Special 
Choir 6; Geography 4; Little 
Theatre I ; Cui Bono 4. 



Page Twenty-six 



LUCILLE POLLEY, 634 

Book Exchange Con. 4; 
Freshman Tea Com. 5; Stu- 
dent Daily Com. 3: Geography 
I, 3. 4; Little Theatre 1, 4. 
o; Cui Bono 5; Poetry 3; 
Soccer I ; Captain Ball 1. 



GENEVIEVE RABIC, 635 
Bulletin Bd. Com.. 4; Student 
Service Com. 3: Geography 
1-4: Little Theatre I: Soccer 
1 ; Captain Ball 1 ; Hiking 5. 



ANTONIA RACO. 635 



W. A. 



Rep. 2; Nor. 



Advertising Mgr. 5; Ceo= 
raphy 3, 4: Little Theatr 
1-6; Foreign Culture 3-fi 
?occer 1 ; Captain Ball 1 
Baseball 2; Volley Ball dpi 
2. All Star 2. 4. 6; Swim 
ming 4; Tennis 3. 



MOLLIE RAIDER, 634 

Geography 3. 4; Little Thea- 



HELEN REGAN, 635 

Chanty Com. 4; Bulletin Bd. 



5, 6; Fellowshii 



Rep. 1 , 



Sketch 3. 4; Poetry 1 ; Sorter 
1.3; Captain Ball 3; All Star 
5; Volley Ball 2; Swimming 



GRACE RENSHAW, 633 



Auditing Com. 1. 2. 5. 
. Choir 1,2; Geography 
4 ; Cui Bono 4-6. 



MARY RICE, 632 

Prom Arrangements Com. 5, 
6; Special Choir 3-6; |r. 
ChoT I. Treas. 2; Geopraphy 
4; Little Theatre 4; Soccer 
1 ; Baseball 2; Volley Ball 2. 






MARGARET ROBERTSON, 
634 
Class Nominating Com 4. 5; 
Fellowship Rep. 3. 4; Special 
Chor 5. 6; |r. Choir 1. 2; 
Geopraphv 1-6; Little Thea- 
tre 2-6; Camera 2 3; Soccer 
I. 3: Cantain Ball 1, 3. 5; 
Baseball 2. 4; Volley Ball 2, 



VIRGINIA ROHEN, 635 
Special Choir 5. 6; Geography 
2-4; Cui Bo-o 4-6. Seo- 
Treas. 5; Mask 5, 6. 



DAVIDA SCHER, 633 

Class Day Stunt Com. Chn 
5. 6; Bulletin Bd. Com. Chn 
4; Frnshman Tea Com. Chn 



5s Campus Com. 
Emblem Ass't. 
e-Up Ed. 6; Usher 
,. A. Rep. 2; Nor- 
Special Choir 6; 



3; Ce 



Theatre 
tain Ball 



SARAH SCOTT, KG6 

Kg-Primarv 1-6; |r. ChoM 
1 -3 ; Geography 1 , 2, 6 



JANET SMITH, 635 

Fellowship Rep. 3; Geography 
4; Cui Bono 5: Soccer 1 ; 
Captain Ball 1; Baseball 2; 
Volley Ball 2. 



CHARLINE SNIDER, 635 



Class Sec. 



St. Coj 



Fee 



Freshman Tea Com 
2; Class Program Com. Chrm 
2. Printing Com. Chrm. 5. 6 
Emblem, Club Write-Up Ed 
6; Fellowship Service Com 
Chrm. 4; Normalite 2. 3 
Feature Ed 4. News Ed 5 
Geography 2-4; Little Theatre 



Cui 



> 4. 5; Camera 3 
Caotam Ball 5 
2, 4; Tennis 4, 5 
6; Riding 5, 6 



MARION SWENSEK, 634 
Executive |udiciary Com. 5 
|r. Choir 1,2: Geography 1-4 
Cui Bono 3. 



Page Twenty-sex 



MERCEDES THOMPSON, 
633 
Class Sec. 1,2; Prom Invita- 
tions and Bids Com. Chrm 
5, 6; Student Daily Ed 6. 
Emblem. Senior Features Ed. 
6; Fudge Sale Com. 4; W. 
A. A. Rep. 5; Normalite 2-6; 
Geography 1-4; Little Thea- 
tre 3. 4; Cui Bono 4-6; Art 
Cuild 1-4; Poetrv 1 ; So-ce- 
1 , 3. Capt. 1 ; Captain Ball 
I 3; Baseball 2. 4; Vole/ 
Ball 2. 4, 6; Tennis 2-6. 

SYLVIA TITELBAUM, 632 
Pro-n Invitations and Bids 
Com. 5. 6; Section Chrm. 3. 
4; Class Nominating Com 
2; Normalite 1.2; Geography 
4; Cui Bono 4-6; Soccer 1.2; 
Captain Ball I ; Volley Ball 2. 



RUTH VAN 
635 


DERVELDE 




Social Hr. C 
4; Sketch 2 
Soccer All 


Dm 5; Geography 

3; Mask 5 6 

Star 1 ; Baseball 



SAM WALLACE, 632 





M 





ETHEL WARNER, KG6 
Fellowship Rep. 5; Kg- 
mary 1-6; Jr. Choir 
Camera 4, 5; Mask 6. 



GERTRUDE WARREN, 635 
Student Service Com. 5; 
Class Publicity Com. Chrm. 
5. 6; Fellowship Rep. 4; 
W. A. A. Rep. 3; Geography 
2-4; Art Guild 2, 3; Sketch 
3-5; Poetry I, 2. 



ETHEL WASHINGTON. 634 
Special Choir 2-6; |r. Choir 
1,2; Geography 2, 4; Soccer 
1 ; Captain Ball 1 ; Baseball 
2; Volley Ball 2. 



MARGARET WIBORG, 632 
Geography 2-4. 



HELEN 


ZIMMERMAN, 635 


Class 


Pres. 


5, 


6; Section 




3. 4; 


Soc 


ial Hr. Com. 


5; S 


Cot 




Nominating 


Com. 


5; W. 




A. Rep. 1 ; 


Specia 


Cho 




1-4; Geog- 




4; C 




Bono 4. 5; 


Volley 


Ball 2 


4; 


Soccer Capt 



OTHER GRADUATES 



Charlotte Adler, 633 
Mavis Blackwell. 633 
Kathryn Burke. 632 
Nettie Chaitkin, 632 
Pauline Degan, UT 
Charlotte Dolan, 700 
James Ferguson, 700 
Elsie L. Friedman, FT 



Mary Ellen Cillooly, 633 
Mercedes Harmon, 633 
Kathryn Hoffman, 632 
Claudia Jackson, 633 
Anna Levin, 635 
Frances Maloney, 633 
Katharine Mann, 632 
Bernice Mayor, 633 
Viola D. McDaniel, 634 



Lucille McLeod, KC6 
Anne Cecelia Reim, 633 
Gertrude Rosenfield, 632 
Elizabeth Simonton, FT 
Bessie Smith, 635 
Anna B. Sosna, FT 
Tillie W. Strauss, 634 
Lorraine Sublette, 700 



Twenty-eight 



NOVEMBER GRADUATES 

When the special courses at Normal were discontinued, making it 
necessary for many to transfer to an elementary course, graduation was 
automatically postponed for those in these courses. Some of these students 
are graduating this November, while many of them will not graduate until 
February or June. 



MARION BERTOSSA 

Roller Skating Mgr. 4; Geog- 
raphy 1-6; Little Theatre 
2-5; Dance 1 



CUSTAVA CARTER 

Class Day Luncheon Com. 5. 
6; Freshman Tea Com Chrm 
5; St. Coun. Assembly Com 
4; Fellowship Refreshment 
Com. 2. 3; Special Choir 5. 
6: Geography 2; H A. 1-4 



FRANCES FISCELLE 

Fellowship Rep. 1 ; Special 
Choir 3-6; |r. Choir I, Pres. 
2; Little Theatre 1-4; Geog- 
raphy 1-6. Sec. 2; Sketch I 
3. 6; Soccer 1 ; Capta.n Ball 
1 ; Volley Ball 2. 



ISABEL COSCICKI 

Class Day Luncheon Com. 
5, 6; Section Chrm. 3-6; 
Executive Judiciary 6; Fresh- 
man Tea Com. 4-6; Lunch- 
room Com. Chrm. 5; Big Sis- 
ter Party Com. 5; Charity 
Tea Com. 3; Class Nominat- 
ing Com. 4; Fellowship Re- 
freshment Com. 1-4, Party 
Com. Chrm. 6; Geography 5. 
6; Cui Bono 4-6; Sketch 2; 
H. A. 1-4; Jr. Choir 5; Swing- 
ing 6; W. A. A. Rep. 2, 3; 



GENEVIEVE CRABER 



Chi 



Sect 



Com. Chrm. 5: Big Sister 
Party Refreshment Com. 4. 
Chrm. 6; Freshman Tea Com 
4. Chrm. 5; Usher 5, 6; Stu- 
dent Adviser 5, 6; All-City 
Girls' Conference Del. 4; Spe- 
cial Choir 5. 41A. 51A; H A. 
1-5. Treas. 3; Cui Bono 4-6. 
41 A, 51 A; St. Coun. Nomi- 
nating Com. 5; Charity Tea 



LOUISE CRAY 
Geography 



Baseball 2; Te 




ETHEL CROSSE 

Special Choir 5. 41 A 
Choir 4, 5; Geography 



ELIZABETH HARNDEN 
W. A, A. Roller Skating Mgr 



LOUISE HERST 

Jr. Choir 1.2; Soccer 



LILLIAN KACZMARSK! 

Jr. Choir 1, 2; Geography 1. 
2; Foreign Culture 4; Base- 
ball Capt. 2; Volley Ball 



MILDRED MAY 

Section Chrm. 1, 2, 6; Class 
Social Com. 5, 6; Fellowship 
Rep. 2, Refreshment Com. 3; 
W. A. A. Rep. 2: Jr. Choir 
5; H. A. 4-6; Little Theatre 



viola McDonnell 



Page Twenty-nine 



RITA McTICUE 

Pin and Ring Com. 2: Section 
Chrm. 1, 2; Bg Sister Party 
Com. 4; Freshman Tea Com. 
4; Class Refreshment Com. 
3. 4: Fellowship Refre.hmen: 
<~om. 6; W. A. A. Rei. 3-6: 
Swimming Team 5. Mgr. 5; 
H. A. 1-4; Geography 1, 2. 
J Easeball Capt. 5: attend- 
ant to Queen of May, 6. 



ESTHER MIES 

Class Vice-Pres. 5. 6: Bie; 
Sister Party Com. 3; Student 
Adviser 6: Fellowship Rose 
Sule Com. 1. Rep. 3, Re- 
freshment Com. Chrm. 3. 
Pres. 4; W. A. A Rep 1 . 
H. A. 1-4. Sec. 3; Geography 
Vice-Pres. 6; Lunchn 
?; Chanty Cc 






Cu 



KAY MULHERN 

Freshman Tea Com. 5: Cla=s 
Program Com. Chrm. 3. 4; 
Rose Sale Com. 6; Special 
Choir 3; |r. Choir 1.2; Geog- 
raphy 1-6; Art Gu-ld 1, Soc- 
cer 1. 3; Captain Ball 1. 



LUCILLE MURRAY 



ELEANOR NASH 
Fellowship Rep. 




HELEN NASH 
Special Choir ! 



MARION NORMOYLE 



Geography 1 
2-4; Dance 
Volley Ball : 



BEATRICE SCHAFFER 
Freshman Tea Com. 2, 
Lunchroom Com. 4; Big Sis 
Party Refreshment Com. 51 



Soci, 



Chr. 



Class Program Com. 41 A. 
51 A; Cass Newspaper Com 
3; Fel'owship Refreshment 
Com. Ch-m. 2. 5, Treas. 3; 
Student Adviser 4; H. A. 1-5. 
Vce-Pres. 2, 4, Pres. 5; Soe- 
cial Chor 5. 41A. 51A; 
Geography 4-6. 41A. 51A; 
Little Theatre 51A; Cui Boro 
4-6, 41 A. 51 A; Avukah 5. 



MARGARET TAHENY 



n Chrm. 3. 4; Big S ster 
Refreshment Com. 4. 
5; Freshman Tea Com. 

ss Social Com. 4; Class 



ROSE WIMBY 

|r. Choir 2; Geography 3, 
Soccer 1 ; Captain Ball 
Volley Ball 2; Archery 4. 



Page Thirty 



CLASSES 



tm 



CLASS OF FEBRUARY 1935 

President Walter Fasan 

Vice-President Virginia Larson 

Secretary Marjorie Winslow 

Treasurer Elizabeth Lewis 

Class Historian Jean Dearborn 

Section before self, class before section, school before class: this is the 
motto of the Class of February, 1935. 

The membership of the class is 140 students, including a number of 
former HA's, PE's, and lA's, added in the reorganization of courses in Sep- 
tember, 1933. Leading and directing the class in all its undertakings are 
the advisers: Dr. Newkirk, chairman. Miss Freeman, Miss Willy, Mrs. Coch- 
ran, Dr. Core, Mr. Wise, and Dr. Sherff. 

The social life of the Lower Seniors has been enlivened by periodical 
class meetings and a number of parties. At one of these during the past 
semester, Section 552 gave a "Radio Revue" and "Crazy to Reduce," and 
Section 551, a musical program and skit. For the Friday assembly, the class 
put on, in its Freshman year, two delightful little plays, an adaptation of 
Pearl Buck's novel, "The Good Earth," and "A Glimpse of the Desert;" and 
later, "Thanks Awfully," a very successful original musical comedy. 

Chairmen and their committees for the Lower Senior Class, already 
selected by the president for their last year at Normal, include: program 
chairman, Harry Lawler; publicity, Helen Price; auditing, Josephine La 
Placa; social, Virginia Larson; general chairman of Commencement, Ernelle 
Carlson; office, Mildred Sika; cap and gown, Grace Mac Downey; pin and 
ring, Betty Lou Bills; tickets and announcements, Selma Goldman; printing, 
Robert Kaeding; class song, Naomi Stein; general chairman of Class Day, 
Dorothy Rietz; luncheon, Rae Chanenson; musicale-stunt, Ruth Hopkins; 
general chairman of Prom, Mary E. Chandler; arrangements, Eileen Keena ; 
music, Helen Marie Kelley; invitations and bids, Joseph Twomey; and pub- 
licity, Lucille McKeag. 



Page Thirty-two 




CLASS OF JUNE 1935 

President James Egan 

Vice-President Mary Elizabeth Townsend 

Secretary Gertrude McCuire 

Treasurer Margaret Trudeau 

The Class of June 1935 originally consisted of two elementary sections, 
a kindergarten section, a household arts section, a physical education sec- 
tion, and a manual training section. In September, 1933, due to the dis- 
continuance of all special departments, the class was reorganized, all stu- 
dents becoming automatically members of the elementary department 
though retaining their sectional groupings. Other additions to the class 
were the former IA4's and the university students who entered in Septem- 
ber. So reconstructed, the class has as advisers Dr. Blount, most helpful 
of chairmen, Miss Doyle, Miss Willy, Miss Freeman, Mrs. Cochran, Miss 
Camenisch, Mr. Henke, and Dr. Newkirk. 

At the beginning of the present year, the class, then the Lower Juniors, 
had a get-together party after summer vacation, with dancing, a program, 
and refreshments. To this affair all the men of the school were invited, 
and a seven-piece orchestra made the occasion outstanding 

Later in October the class gave a "Welcome Tea," which officially 
welcomed into the class the new members, the lA's, UT's, and several 
others. Tea was served, and a musicale was given. Two more social affairs, 
a dance in the gymnasium during May and a tea in June, rounded out the 
year's activities. 

The class has two outstanding committees. The first, the social com- 
mittee whose duty it is to plan all class activities such as parties, has for 
its chairman, Lucille Schaffer. Through her efforts plans for the two big 
parties were made and executed. The second committee, namely the program 
committee, has as chairman Helene Quast. Because of her clever manage- 
ment the class was provided with entertainment for all parties and meetings. 

It is the Upper Juniors' hope that their final year will prove as success- 
ful and enjoyable as this year. 



Page Thirty-three 




CLASS OF FEBRUARY 1936 

President Columba Zarega 

Vice-President Lillian Anderson 

Secretary Rosanna Garrison 

Treasurer Lucile Walp 

Historian Elizabeth Bard 

"To make the class a more united body and as a whole to enable it 
to uphold and support the high standards of the Chicago Normal College; 
and to be loyal to the class and instructors in thought, word, and deed, and 
to give forth its best efforts in their behalf" is the purpose of the class of 
February, 1936. Other objectives are: to support the Normal College Parent- 
Teachers Association; and to beautify the campus. 

The first officers of the present Lower Juniors were: president, Mary 
Leonard; vice-president, Ada Blakeway; secretary, Carol Wise; treasurer, 
Mary Cummings; historian, Helen Youngreen. There are four standing com- 
mittees: auditing, program, social, publications and publicity. 

During their first semester at Normal and after they had become more 
acquainted with College customs and activities, the Lower Juniors presented 
at an assembly a pageant play entitled "The Freshmen's Reactions the First 
Day at Normal." 

Further to bring the class of fifty-five together, various parties were 
carefully planned. In June of the first semester, a beach party at Jackson 
Park was largely attended and much enjoyed. At Christmas, the class gave 
a merry party of welcome to the Freshmen, in which a grab bag containing 
gifts for all proved an effective "ice-breaker," followed by games in the 
holiday spirit. 

The class advisers, Mrs. Cochran, Miss Cildemeister, and Mr. Hannan, 
with Miss Olson as chairman of advisers, have guided the class over the 
difficulties encountered. Faculty counsel and understanding prove impor- 
tant the first three semesters when organization of the class into smooth- 
running order is so necessary. 



Page Thirty-fov 




CLASS OF JUNE 1936 

President Betty Sundmacher 

Vice-President Grace Dunn 

Secretary Marguerite Klein 

Treasurer Kathryn Bonfield 

"The aim of the Class of June 1936 is that education may be realized 
more fully, that the welfare of the teaching profession may be promoted, 
that future teachers may know what is considered proper procedure, and 
may bring to their professional relations higher standards of conduct." This 
platform of the June '36 Class is directly quoted from the preamble to their 
constitution, drawn up last semester by Rachel Rosen, the chairman 

Seventy-three students are in this class, of which there are four 
sections. The section advisers include Mr. Brye, Mrs. Schacht, Miss Swa- 
wite, and Miss Hutchison. Mr. Brye acts as chairman of advisers. 

Eight class meetings have been held within the year. To cope with 
the sundry activities, several committees were appointed: a social commit- 
tee, Florence Wiaduck, chairman; a program committee, Elaine Skelton; 
an auditing committee, Evelyn Clazer; a publicity committee, Glenn Arm- 
strong. 

At the end of the first term, a change was made in the organization 
of the several sections, in the interest of greater class solidarity and co- 
operation, and each student found himself in a new group. Other means 
of drawing the class more closely together have been the three parties, 
with their pleasant programs of dancing, music, pantomime, and recitation. 

On Friday, April 20, an assembly explaining the work being done by 
section 201, one of the two experimental sections in the school, was pre- 
sented. With Miss Garthe directing, a scene, "An Experiment in Music," 
depicting the way creative music work could be conducted with school 
children, was put on by this section. The rest of the assembly was devoted 
to a representation of typical classes, discussions, and work done by the 
group. 



Page Thirty-five 



CLASS OF FEBRUARY 1937 

Seventy students compose the Lower Freshman Class. There are 
three elementary sections under the helpful supervision of their faculty 
advisers. Miss Byrne, Miss Cabell, and Miss Jacobs. Mr. Brye acts as chair- 
man of advisers to these lower freshmen, as yet unorganized as a class. 
Following the program which was adopted last fall, section 161 was chosen 
as the experimental group. 





Page Thirty-six 



ACTI VITI ES 




EMBLEM STAFF 



Page Thirty-eight 



EMBLEM 

Winifred Erickson Katherine Jansson 

Co-Editor Co-Editor 

William Wilson Franke Henke Elmer Morrow Mary Draine 

General Adviser Business Adviser Technicalities Adviser Staff Typist 

Edmund Kubik Antonio Rago p n ,| Lewis P aul Enrietto 

Business Manager Advertising Manager Circulat on Manager Publicity Manager 

Lillian Lehman Joseph Twomey n . . c . _ Helen Peterson 

Photo Editor Asst. Photo Editor Uavida scner Senior Write-Up Edit 



Charlme Snider Charlotte Levmson Editor ^•'^'^ Evelyn Schwartz 

Write-Up Editor Asst Write-Up Editor Asst. Write-Up Editor 

Helen Anderson Mercedes Thompson Harr Y Lawler | rene Fermier 

Art Editor Senior Features s P orts Edl,or Freshman Features 

Eileen Casey Mildred Bagy Alice Hanson Margaret Kelliher 

Humor Editor Humor Ed. tor )un or Features Copy Desk Editor 

The Emblem represents the successful culmination of plans carefully 
laid last December. Two and a half years had passed since the annual of 
the College had been published. To issue the book costs were pared to a 
minimum and an Emblem of sixty-four pages planned. 

"Hand-picked" from the student body by the co-editors, the staff 
was small, but their cooperation was a splendid thing to see. Philip Lewis 
as circulation manager boosted sales to an undreamed-of height. Antonia 
Rago, advertising manager, promised to secure ten pages of advertising 
and then proceeded to fulfil this obligation. Paul Enrietto, in his capacity 
of publicity manager, papered the corridors with posters urging students 
to order an annual. Business manager Edmund Kubik, working with Mr. 
Henke, business adviser, assured the staff in February that the Emblem was 
a sound fact financially. 

So successful were the sales and advertising campaign that the book 
was increased in size from sixty-four to one hundred and eight pages. Sheer 
simplicity was the ideal set by the art editor, Helen Anderson. 

The myriad of technical details that are connected with publishing the 
Emblem are not visible to the casual observer. Only staff members can 
fully appreciate the painstaking effort involved in compiling and editing 
the senior write-ups. This task fell to Helen Peterson and Davida Sher. 

The organization, writing, and re-writing of over thirty-five write-ups 
was accomplished by Charline Snider, write-up editor. There may be much 
controversy as to whose was the hardest job, but Charline is entitled to a 
strong vote. Charlotte Levinson, Evelyn Schwartz and Harry Lawler were 
her assistants To Lillian Lehman the important job of scheduling seniors 
for photographs was delegated. 

With Joseph Twomey in charge of group pictures, this part of editing 
the book went smoothly. Irene Fermier, Alice Hanson, and Mercedes 
Thompson capably handled the features of the Emblem, and Mildred Bagy 
and Eileen Casey edited the humor. To Margaret Kelliher, copy desk editor, 
and Mary Draine, staff typist, goes the credit of accurate copy and mistake- 
free page proof. 

Worry and disappointments were minimized because of the coopera- 
tion of Mr. Wilson as general adviser, Mr. Morrow, technical adviser, and 
Mr. Henke, business adviser. 

Page Thirty-nine 




NORMALITE 

Winifred Erickson Editor-in-Chief James Burd 

Charline Snider News Editor Charlotte Levinson 

James Burd Feature Editor Ruth Horlick 

Dorothy Eirich Club Editor Louise Barzan 

Paul Enrietto Sports Editor Helene de Lhorbe 

To keep the student body well informed on every Normal College 
activity is the goal toward which the Normalite staff is constantly striving. 
The Normalite aims to represent the students and to uphold the ideals of 
the school. 

The Normalite is divided into the literary and business departments. 
The business department embraces advertising, circulation, and finances. 
In the literary field, news of general interest to the student body, editorial 
comment and features, club and class activities, and sports reviews are 
covered. 

A luncheon and a tea at which the succeeding editors are introduced, 
are traditional semester high-lights. The staff is indebted to the advisers, 
Dr. Newkirk, Miss Cabell, and Miss Byrne. 




Page Forty 



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Eileen Casey. 



STUDENT DAILY 
Editor 



Mercedes Thompson 



A unique publication is situated in Normal's north corridor for who- 
ever cares to see it. It is the Student Daily, a small bulletin board, which, 
nevertheless, is a potent factor in school life, expressing student opinion. 

Student Daily assumed significance not only in spreading student 
opinion, but also as a means of advertising and of bringing activities to the 
notice of the College. On days of important elections, such as Student 
Council, Fellowship, and May Queen, the Student Daily is devoted to pic- 
tures and write-ups of the candidates. Assemblies, parties, sales, and 
similar events are publicized through this medium. 

Established in 1930 in answer to a desire of the student body for un- 
censored publicity, the Student Daily appears with only two restrictions 
upon the material used in it; first, there must be no criticism of the "insti- 
tution as a whole," and finally, no criticism of the "faculty as individuals." 

The organization of Student Daily is simplicity itself. An editor and 
a general committee are appointed each semester by the president of Stu- 
dent Council. These, together with a representative elected by each section, 
are responsible for the publication of Student Daily. 

The policy adopted by Student Daily varies every semester with the 
individual editor. During the fall term sections used the board to acquaint 
the College with the members and activities of their group. This spring 
semester an experiment has been conducted in having one member of the 
Student Daily Committee responsible for each class. This semester's com- 
mittee included Charlotte Levinson, Lorraine Malmberg, Mary O'Malley, and 
Harold Winegar. 



Forty-one 



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STUDENT COUNCIL 

Dorothy Lembach President Alice Hanson 

Helen Kuglin Vice-President Eva Basara 

Katherine Jansson Secretary Marjorie Land is 

Joseph Portle Treasurer Vincent Conroy 

Charline Snider Fee Accountant Jane Bevan 

The Student Self-Covernment Association was organized in 1924 for 
the purpose of promoting solidarity in the student body and of uniting 
students and faculty in constructive effort for the welfare of the school. 
Each student becomes a member of the Association upon entering the 
College. 

The Student Council, the governing body of the Association, is com- 
posed of the presidents of the classes, the chairmen of sections, and the 
faculty advisers, Mrs. Muller, Miss Robinson, and Dr. Branom. 

The Council discusses and acts upon many matters concerning activities 
and interests of the student body; brings suggestions from the faculty to 
the student body and from the student body to the faculty; represents and 
acts for the students in philanthropic enterprises, as at Thanksgiving and 
Christmas time; and maintains standing committees which initiate or direct 
various movements among the student body. 



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Page Forty-two 




FELLOWSHIP 

Louise Barzan President Lillian Friedman 

James Jabrosky Vice-President Betty Williamson 

Helen Brachtl Secretary Ruth Hopkins 

Margaret Condon Treasurer Robert McCann 

Fellowship is a club to which every student at Normal belongs since it 
is one of the organizations which is supported by the registration fee. It 
is a philanthropic organization which aids schools situated in districts where 
the children do not have proper nourishment. It maintains a lunch and 
milk fund at the Hamline and Hedges Schools and a lunch fund at the 
Sherwood. Plans have been made to add another school to these three, 
and thus further enlarge the scope of Fellowship's activities. At Thanks- 
giving, baskets are distributed to needy families. 

Funds for carrying out this work are raised by various means: by a 
Rose Sale, held once during each semester (this last semester it chanced to 
come on the first day of spring!) ; by fudge sales, conducted every Wednes- 
day; a Toy Week; the sale of Christmas seals; and a program to which 
admission is charged. Each semester two social functions are held. Miss 
Robinson, the Fellowship adviser, has given invaluable help in all these 
activities. 






Page Forty-three 



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SPECIAL CHOIR 

President Muriel Dodd 

Vice-President Emily Flosi 

Secretary-Treasurer Grace McDowney 

The Special Choir, under the direction of Miss Carthe, is one of the 
largest clubs at Normal, having a membership of approximately one hundred 
twenty-five. It consists of a select group of voices chosen by Miss Carthe. 

The main purpose of the club is to bring together those who love to 
sing, so that they may enjoy an hour of beautiful, inspiring music. 

During the year, the Special Choir prepares two outstanding programs, 
one at Christmas time, composed of Christmas songs, and one to celebrate 
the coming of spring. 

For this semester's spring program the Spec-al Choir presented the two 
selections, "Love's Dream," by Franz Liszt, and "Seraphic Song," by Rubin- 
stein. Some Chorus members took part in a program at the Englewood 
Woman's Club. 



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Page Forty-foui 




ORCHESTRA 

The Chicago Normal College orchestra, under the leadership of Miss 
Peickert, has been in existence for the past two years. Much credit is due 
Miss Peickert, who organized the orchestra. It is composed of members who 
have had previous training in any of the instruments. Various types of 
music are played at the club hour meetings, which are a source of enjoyment 
to the members. The orchestra plays for the Commencement exercises in 
February and June. 



MEN'S CHORUS 

Stimulated by a real desire to sing, and inspired by a love for good 
music, the Men's Chorus, though a comparatively new organization, is pro- 
gressing rapidly, under the capable leadership of Miss Gildemeister. It was 
organized three semesters ago under the direction of Miss Taheny. There 
are about twenty-five members. During the club hour the group practices 
on four-part songs of both humorous and classical types. 



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Page Forty-five 




ART GUILD 

To develop art in connection with all school activities; to offer stu- 
dents added opportunities in poster-making, sketching, and work in the 
various crafts; and to keep the student body informed on all current art 
activities, such as lectures, exhibits, or other art interests, is the purpose 
of the Art Guild, an organization sponsored by the Graphic Art Department. 
It has monthly meetings. The club owes its growth and development to the 
advisers, Miss Hutchison and Mr. Geilen. 



Lillian Rains- 



SKETCH CLUB 
Student Leader Catherine McCafferty 



The Sketch Club, which meets under the direction of Mr. Geilen dur- 
ing club hour, gives members many opportunities to sketch, using various 
mediums, different posing figures. Some typical poses sketched by the 
club within the last year have been from Spanish, Scotch, ballet, tennis, and 
formally garbed models. 



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Page Forty- 




MASK AND PHOTOCS CLUBS 

The Photogs, under Mr. Morrow's direction, for those who desire to 
make a more effective use of their cameras, are interested in snap-shots, 
enlargements, slide-making, colored photos, portraits, movies, theatrical 
photos, and scientific photography. 

People who are interested in mask-making meet with Miss Doyle 
during club hour. Masks are made for personal use in dramatics, for wall 
decorations, or for puppets and marionettes. 



POETRY CLUB 

The Poetry Club was formed by a group of students who love poetry 
and enjoy hearing it read. This year has seen a number of vitally interesting 
discussions at the meetings; an informal debate concerning "the poets of 
the people" was one of these. The members of the club have appreciated 
Miss Camenisch, their adviser, whose enthusiasm and interest have helped 
to make the club worth while. 




Page Forty-seven 



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LITTLE THEATRE 

President. Joseph Portle 

Vice-President Jean Sandahl 

Secretary Mary Azzarello 

Treasurer Harriet Jacobsen 

Because of each member's spirit of co-operation, the Little Theatre is 
successful with its six departments, Art, Business, Make-Up, Marionette, 
Stagecraft, and Players. These work together and combine their efforts in 
a climax the night of the "big" production or evening play to which the 
public is invited. 

Taking over the art side of the plays the Art Croup is responsible for 
making posters and bulletin boards advertising all performances. Planning 
excursions, printing "Little Theatre News," and running the financial end 
of the organization are the duties of the Business Croup. Little Theatre 
has a Make-Up Croup of which it may be justly proud. Making puppets 
and staging marionette shows make up the activities of the Marionette 
Croup. The Stagecraft Department has charge of the stage for big plays 



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Page Forty-eight 



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as well as the plays given at club meetings. The Players' Croup is divided 
into smaller sections, each section giving a short play at one of the meetings. 

Activities of the Little Theatre this year have been varied. The Players' 
Croup presented the following plays at the Club meetings: "The Florist 
Shop," "Too Many Marys," "Six Cups of Chocolate." "Bird's Christmas 
Carol" (an original dramatization by Normal students), "Grandma Pulls 
the String," and "Thank You, Doctor." The Make-Up Croup gave a dem- 
onstration of its talent at one meetings. The officials of these groups were: 
Make-Up: Mary Ronan, chairman, Margaret Wilson, instructor; Marionette: 
Elizabeth Holmes, chairman; Stagecraft: Dorothy Been, chairman, Roy Lun- 
dahl, stage manager; Players: Mary Elizabeth Chandler, chairman; Art: 
Lorayne Carroll, chairman; Business: Loraine Malmberg, chairman; Marjorie 
Winslow, editor of Little Theatre News. A Hallowe'en party at Hull House, 
a visit to the Chicago Lighting Institute, and several theatre parties were 
among other activities. 

On Friday, April 20, Little Theatre presented "The Charm School." 
The play, ably directed by Miss Jacobs, the club sponsor, and handled by an 
adequate cast, was very successful. 



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Page Forty- 




GEOGRAPHY CLUB 

Lucille McKeag President Helen Baldry 

Betty Williamson Vice-President Esther Mies 

Catherine McNeil is Secretary Marion Panko 

Ethel Helander Treasurer Mary Leonard 

Organized in 1925, the Geography Club has for its basic purpose the 
promotion of an active interest in geography. In addition the club's policy 
has furthered a spirit of fellowship and friendly cooperation among its mem- 
bers. Four standing committees, selected by the president, assist in man- 
aging the affairs of the club. They are social, publicity, membership, and 
excursion committees. 

Variety and originality are the keynotes of the programs presented 
every other Thursday at three o'clock. Usually each meeting is in charge 
of a group of students from the same section. Guest speakers, lantern 
slides, moving pictures, and plays provide material for many interesting 
features, all presented in an informal and enjoyable way. 




Page Fifty 



'-Mil 1 . I 



Typical of the novel programs were those given the second semester 
of the school year. Piloted by one of the sections, an imaginative trip to 
Utopia was taken. The voyage was in the form of a play, and two of the 
faculty members were prominent characters depicted. Another program 
which proved to be of great interest to the College geographers was that 
concerning the Kentucky Mountain region of the United States. Grey 
Earth, an American Indian who spoke of his life and travels in a manner 
calculated to excite his listeners, made a third meeting entertaining. 

An innovation seen this last year is a membership drive. In the spring 
semester the club was divided into four teams who competed with one 
another in enrolling new members in a club that already had more followers 
than any other in the College. The names of countries were used to dis- 
tinguish each team, and their progress was represented in a graph. Winners 
of the contest were announced at a party, the one wholly social event of the 
Geography Club calendar. 

The club reflects in a very great measure the attitude of its sponsor, 
Dr. Branom. He encourages an active and vital interest in geography and 
because of his spirit of friendliness the club is one of real comradeship. 




Page Fifty-or, 




CUI BONO 

Agnes Vial I President Harry Osterherdt 

Katharine Mann Vice-President Lucille McKeag 

Virginia Rohen Secretary Virginia King 

James Burd Treasurer Dorothea Epstein 

The Cui Bono Club occupies the same position at Normal that national 
honor clubs and societies hold at other colleges throughout the country. 
This club today is the oldest organization in the school, as it was founded 
twenty-five years ago in 1908 by Myron Ashley, then an instructor at the 
College. 

Membership is limited, being granted only on recommendation of a 
faculty member, and after an official acceptance. At present it is about 
seventV-five. Meetings are held twice a month, at which planned pro- 
grams consisting of reports, discussions, and talks by invited guests or 
faculty members, are given. A party and trips are also sponsored. The 
success of the activities has been due to the direction of the sponsor. Miss 
Hallinan. 




Page Fifty-two 




KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY CLUB 

That the students taking the Kindergarten-Primary Course might be- 
come better acqua nted, and that further interest in professional activities 
might be awakened, the Kindergarten-Primary Club was formed. Its activi- 
ties, however, have centered around the studying of other fields, so that 
the students will have a well-rounded development. In their work the girls 
have had the sympathetic cooperation of Miss Olson and Miss Willy, their 
advisers. 



MATH CLUB 

To keep abreast of problems of geometry, algebra, and trigonometry; 
to make a study of the entertainment side of mathematics; and to make a 
survey of college mathematics with purposeful introduction: such is the 
three-fold purpose of the reorganized Math Club under the able sponsorship 
of Mr. Miller. This semester, a guest speaker, Mr. H. B. Loomis, and Mr. 
Ceilen presented interesting programs on mathematical tricks and puzzles. 




Page Fifty-three 




FOREIGN CULTURE CLUB 

The Foreign Culture Club, directed by Miss Hallinan, was formed to 
further the study of the culture of foreign peoples. During the past semes- 
ter the art, music, and education of foreign countries were discussed at the 
club meetings, and several excursions were taken to foreign centers in 
Chicago. This club has no dues nor officers, but at each meeting a chairman 
is appointed to lead the next discussion. 



AVUKAH 

The Chicago Normal College Avukah, sponsored by Mr. Wise, is a 
chapter of the Avukah Organization of Chicago which has branches on 
other Chicago college campuses. The campus groups strive to promote 
interest in Jewish culture among the Jewish students and their friends. At 
the Normal meetings events, personalities, and literature are discussed by 
the members of the club, and outside speakers are also featured. 



2#.'§K 



Page Fifty-foui 




SOCIAL DANCING CLUB 
To do away with the stag line at Social Hour and by so doing to 
teach those to dance who haven't learned before, is the aim of the Social 
Dancing Club. Ably sponsored by Miss Byrne, the members are instructed 
by Harriett Smith and assisted by Agnes Crosche, who strive to cover all 
the fundamental dance steps, and this semester are stressing the waltz and 
the two-step. 



SOCIAL HOUR 
Social Hour, sponsored by Student Council and arranged by a committee 
under Irene Fermier, chairman, is a period of social dancing. It is held in 
the gymnasium every Friday afternoon from October to May. Social Hour 
provides an opportunity for students to meet one another on a social status, 
and it offers the added chance for students of different sections and classes 
to become better acquainted with one another. 




Page Fiftii-tir, 



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LIBRARY 

The library of the Normal College is impressive. Redesigned and re- 
built two years ago, it is one of the beauty spots of the College. It houses 
32,000 volumes — fiction, poetry, reference books on every subject matter 
of the curriculum, and a particularly complete collection of bound periodi- 
cals, professional and general, from their first issue to the present. In re- 
spect of this type of reference material, the library has been, up to the 
past year, the equal of any in the Middle West. The present financial con- 
dition of the Board of Education, however, perils the future of this collec- 
tion. This year most of the one hundred and sixty magazines have been 
discontinued, leaving only a few of the most important. Of these, educa- 
tional journals form of course the major part, and most of these were either 
contributed or paid for by friends of the library. 

A part of the library which has not received as much attention from 
the student body as it deserves, is the fine coUection of pictures over a wide 
range of subjects. Students may take these out on their library cards. In 
the southwest corner of the library is a subdivision which Miss Bates, the 
head librarian, hopes to devote to the exhibition of beautiful and unusual 
books, featuring particularly illustrated books for children. 

Books are arranged by the Dewey decimal system of classification. 
Students, however, are not free to go to the stacks. Assisting Miss Bates 
are Mrs. Johnston, assistant librarian, and a number of volunteer student 
workers. 



Page Fifty-six 



SENIOR PROM 

To the strains of Bob Keath's orchestra, a host of Normal's students 
and faculty members with their guests, danced in the beautiful club room 
on the seventeenth floor of the Furniture Mart. It was Friday evening, 
June 1, and the event was the Senior Prom. Cool breezes from Lake 
Michigan helped to make the affair one to be remembered. 

Helen Peterson, chairman of the committee that planned this delight- 
ful evening, was assisted in her work by the following people: Margaret 
Condon, Beatrice Pennington, and Mary Rice of the arrangements commit- 
tee; "Ti Mie Strauss, Irene Fermier, and Alva Loveless of the music committee; 
Mercedes Thompson, Alice Hanson, and Sylvia Titelbaum of the invitations 
and bids committee; and Winifred Erickson, Mildred Neuffer, and Dorothy 
Coller of the publicity committee. The first girl in each of these groups 
served as chairman of the committee. 

CLASS DAY 

One of the most memorable events of graduation week is Class Day, 
which usually includes a morning assembly, a luncheon, and stunts in the 
afternoon. This is the last social function of the seniors before Commence- 
ment. Class Day uniquely combines entertainment with a program in which 
the seniors are privileged to participate. 

The Class Day of June 1934 was marked by the spirit of fun and com- 
radeship which characterized the social college career of the seniors. In 
the morning the traditional program was given in which President Laughlin 
and the class officers took part. The Class Day luncheon, the one feature 
of the day exclusively for the Upper Senior Class, was successful and con- 
tributed greatly to the friendliness and enthusiasm with which the seniors 
presented the afternoon stunts. Each stunt was given by one of the gradu- 
ating sections, and the resulting program was a blending of capers, music, 
and humor. Much credit was due to Lillian Lehman, who was chairman 
of the committee. 

COMMENCEMENT 

Entering to the stately strains of the processional march played by the 
College orchestra, the class of June 1934 culminated its term at Normal on 
Friday, June 15, at ten o'clock, in the College auditorium. After a program 
of several musical numbers had been played, President Laughlin introduced 
the Commencement speaker, Dr. Harold Leonard Bowman, minister of the 
First Presbyterian Church, to the audience. 

Dr. Bowman has achieved an enviable reputation by his vigorous and 
fearless defense of education against its enemies during the recent educa- 
tional crisis. His insight into education and the current problems which 
have assailed it on all sides made his address particularly significant to an 
understanding and appreciative audience. 

Presentation of diplomas to the graduates by President Laughlin fol- 
lowed the Commencement address. The class song, an original composi- 
tion of one of the class, was sung by the graduates. 

Page Fifty-seven 



ASSEMBLIES 

After listening to Roscoe Conkling Simmons' address at the first 
assembly of the semester, students of Normal went back to their classes 
with a new and better insight into the life and ideals of one of America's 
greatest men, Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Simmons, a nephew of Booker T. 
Washington and editor of a leading colored newspaper, spoke of Lincoln 
as "King of Men." 

Lithography, a highly developed art in the printing industry, was the 
theme of the guest speaker, Mr. Raymond Nelson, at the assembly on 
February 23. Mr. Nelson placed considerable emphasis on the modern 
trend toward appreciation of color in our surroundings, citing as instances 
the color effects of A Century of Progress Exposition and the adoption of 
varied colors for cars by the automobile industry. In order to give his 
audience an understanding of what lithography is and how it functions, Mr. 
Nelson traced the process from its discovery to its present highly specialized 
state. He exhibited varied samples of lithography, one of which illustrated 
the process in a series of steps to the final product. Mr. Robert French, 
formerly an instructor at the Normal College, gave a brief address on art 
and drawing which he illustrated with a sketch. 

The Geography Club took charge of the assembly on March 12. An 
example of one of the numbers was section 41 l's illustration of the origin 
of the fan, in a scene called "The Story of Fan Shi Chu." This program 
was typical of the ones given at the bi-monthly meetings of the Geography 
Club. 

Mr. Irvin A. Wilson, principal of the Delano School and past president 
of the Principals' Club, was the speaker at the Cui Bono assembly. His! 
talk was on "Education or Catastrophe, Which?" Mr. Wilson said that in 
order to make democracy safe for the world, the school of tomorrow would 
have to be an institution organized for social democracy; both its pupils 
and its teachers would have to be so completely unshackled that they would 
be able to express their thoughts and to carry out their ideas regardless of 
politics or other factors. 

A particularly fine assembly was given April 6, when section 632 
presented as part of their course in auditorium work a fantasy entitled 
"1784-1934," adapted from the famous "Berkeley Square." Sam Wallace 
played the part of Peter Standish, a young man obsessed with the idea of 
living in the eighteenth century, who, finally succumbing to the influence 
of a house two centuries old, came to believe that he really was living at 
that time. Angela Knudtzon was the lovely heroine, while Kathryn Burke 
took the part of the Duchess. Others who acted in the play were Helen 
Louise Collins, Mary Rice, James Burd, Rosalind Conley, and Robert McCann. 
Appropriate lighting effects and costuming were largely responsible for the 
air of reality which pervaded the play. 

Page Fifty-eight 



On April 20, the experimental group gave an assembly in which they 
told of their work and activities. May 1 ] saw the W. A. A. assembly fea- 
ture a variety program in the physical education field. Included among the 
exhibits were ping pong, dancing, first aid, and a play. The M. A A 
assembly, an original novelty, was the last of the year. James Egan, presi- 
dent of the M. A. A. was chief overseer, and the program was planned by 
Philip Lewis and John Byrne. 

PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION 

Honorary President Mrs. Wm. Hefferan 

President Mrs. Christian Pedersen 

First Vice-President Mrs. Wm. Jahnke 

Second Vice-President Dr. Sherff 

Third Vice-President Fred Anderson 

Secretary Mrs. Wm. Wigger 

Corresponding Secretary. Mrs. F. J. Snowden 

Treasurer Mrs. Harold Kaeding 

Honorary Director President Laughlin 

The Chicago Normal College Parent-Teachers Association is unique of 
its kind; it is the only parent-teacher association in an Illinois College. 
Since the students of the school are future teachers, they are logically mem- 
bers, and one of the chief purposes of organizing the Association was to 
bring these members into contact with parent-teacher members and acquaint 
them with the possibilities of such an organization. 

The Association was organized on the evening of February 6, 1933, 
primarily for helping to avert a rumored crisis — the closing of the College — 
and at various crucial times it has effectively abetted this cause. Through- 
out the following spring it was very active. On April 4, a program was 
presented at the College, features of which were a String Ensemble, led by 
Miss Peickert; a play by the Little Theatre, under Miss Jacobs, Barrie's 
"Twelve-Pound Look;" vocal solos by Jeanne DeVaney; and an exhibition 
of work done by the crippled children of the Christopher Public School. On 
May 19, the Association sponsored the Little Theatre play, "Mrs. Bump- 
stead-Leigh," sharing the profits. On graduation day Mrs. Pedersen pre- 
sented this money in a check to President Laughlin, to be used for sub- 
scription to current magazines for the College library. 

On November 9, as a contribution to Education Week, the Association 
sponsored an assembly program which included talks by students and an 
address by Mr. Peter Mortenson, former superintendent of schools and 
former principal of the Parental School. Within the last semester, the 
Association has had no public meetings but continues to show an ever-ready 
co-operative spirit in connection with whatever the College undertakes. 

The present committee chairmen of the Association are: membership, 
Miss Cildemeister; hospitality, Miss Peickert; ways and means, Miss Halli- 
nan ; and publicity, Miss Jahnke. Of these, the first three are College 
instructors. 

Page Fifty-nine 



CHRISTMAS FROLIC 

Originated by the late president of the Normal College, Dr. William 
Bishop Owen, the Christmas Frolic has become a tradition at Normal. 

As is customary at this gathering, the whole school turns out — all 
sections and faculty members — and each class comes arrayed in a different 
gaily decorative costume, indicative of the Christmas spirit. The costumes, 
made of inexpensive materials, are designed and submitted to the art de- 
partment by various art representatives. A winning costume is chosen for 
each class to make in an art class and to display in the Grand March. Thus 
among the festively clad frolickers may be seen Santas, poinsettias, skaters, 
candles, stars, and other seasonal representations. 

At the Christmas Frolic this year the sixty-fifth birthday of Normal 
was celebrated. After the classes had assembled in the gymnasium in their 
respective places, in marched the Birthday Cake. Guards, while Dorothy 
Blyth carried the cake. The "Guards" led the rest of the students and 
faculty in the Grand March. As features of the program a novelty dance 
was presented by each class, and Christmas surprises to the members of 
the faculty were given when all were gathered around the Christmas tree. 
Then Christmas songs, dances, music, and finally social dancing held sway. 

Helping to make this annual school party one of the most successful 
and outstanding events of the year, were Mary Finan, chairman of the social 
committee of Student Council, and Sam Wallace, Master of Ceremonies. 



SPRING FESTIVAL 

One of the oldest, and undoubtedly one of the most colorful traditions 
of the college is the annual Spring Festival, which takes place in the gym- 
nasium the Friday before spring vacation. Together with the Christmas 
Frolic, it was evolved to make school life real and fine in a spiritual way 
at certain times of the year. 

The scene on Friday, April 27, was indeed one of colorful pageantry. 
Lucille Fairbairn, Queen of May, looked very regal in her long flowing gown 
of gold satin and her high crown ornamented by a wreath of yellow and 
white roses. Her attendants, Agnes Grosche, Marjorie Landis, Rita Mc- 
Tigue, Helen Peterson, and Betty Williamson helped to adorn the already 
impressive dais upon which the throne was placed. The guards of the 
Queen, twenty-four in number, were dressed in elaborate costumes of the 
Roman legionnaire type. They gave a feature dance and drill preliminary 
to escorting the Queen to her throne where she received her crown from 
Mrs. Muller. 

The crowning of the Queen was followed by a May pole dance given 
for the pleasure of the Queen and the entire group of revelers. The pro- 
gram was concluded with the May Day gallop, in which the whole school 
was invited to participate. 

Page Sixty 



ATH LETICS 



J &AJL 


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ADVISORY BOARD 
FEBRUARY TO |UNE 1934 
Jane Bevan, Gladys Fox, Helen de Lhorbe, Florence Westermeyer, Katherine Imhahn, Lauretta 
Kotwicki, Mary Pratscher, Rita McTigue. 

Mildred Sika, Eleanore M. Young, Mrs. Nellie Cochran, Mildred Greene, Mildred Williams. 
Alice McCarthy, Clarice Lee. 






ADVISORY BOARD 

SEPTEMBER TO FEBRUARY 1933-34 

Mary McCullough, Charlotte Levmson, Mildred Williams, Gladys Fox, Alice McCarthy. 
June Rades, Flemmie Lancianese, Helen Marie Kelley, Betty Likas, Thelma Lundgren. 



Page Sixty-twi 




Page Sixty-three 




CAPTAIN BALL— ALL STAR 

BACK ROW — Edna Sonken, Jane Bevan, Margaret Fitzgibbons, Lauretta Kotwicki, Ruth Duff, 
Agnes Crosche, Hazel Lindquist, Thelma Schulfer, Irma Widman, Florence Westermeyer, 
Catherine McCafferty. 

FRONT ROW — Margaret Krafft, Eleanor M. Young, Betty Sundmacher, Stasia Hayman, 
Mildred Williams, Mildred Greene, Dorothy Rietz, Mary Pratscher, Alice McCarthy, Clarice Lee. 




CAPTAIN BALL CHAMPS— SECTION 43B 

BACK ROW — Mary Pratscher, Lauretta Kotwicki, Hazel Lindquist, Esther Hicks, Carmela 

Agnes Crosche, Mildred Williams, 



Petrone 

FRONT ROW — Mildren Gree 

Helen Peacock. 



Helen Marie Kelle 




CAPTAIN BALL— RUNNER-UP— SECTION 342 

BACK ROW — Harriet Jacobsen, Virginia Henaghan, Helen Youngreen, Thelma Lundgren, 

Gertrude Riordan, Saraiane Caddick. 

FRONT ROW — Lucille Sullivan, Phyllis Ebert, Ada Blakeway, Leona Stein, Alyss DeMarais, 

Lois Bruckner, Colomba Zerega. 

Page Sixty-four 




VOLLEY BALL— ALL STAR 

Antonia Rago, Mary Pratscher. Lillian Anderson, Hazel Taylor, Frances Macy. Laurett 
Kotwicki, Mildred Williams, Carmela Petrone, Jessie Shults, Eleanor M. Young, Alic 
McCarthy, Helen Peacock. 




VOLLEY BALL— RUNNER-UP— SECTION 341 

BACK ROW — Mary Cummings, Genevieve Larson, Frances Macy, Elizabeth Bard. Carol Wi 

Lillian Anderson. 

FRONT ROW— Clarice Lee, Alice McCarthy, Elizabeth Vogelei, Eleanor Elesberg, Elv 

Streisinger. 



Pag, Sixtv 




TENNIS TEAM 

Helen Youngreen, Frances Macy, Lauretta Kotwicki, Carol Wise, Gladys Fc 
Mary Leahy, Mary Pratscher. 




ARCHERY CLUB 

?ne Ratsky, Lauretta Kotwicki, Gladys Fox. 



Page Sixty-six 



* 1 Wa. " I 



PING-PONG 

ildred Williams, Carmela Petrone. 




Lorraine Zimmer, Kay 



HORSEBACK RIDING 



-ihahn, Lois Schuman, Charline Snider 
Gladys Fox, and Tony Rago. 



Page Sixty-seven 




SWIMMING TEAM 



Rita McTigue, Mildred Greene, Elizabeth Mueller, Lauretta Kotwicki, Hazel Taylor, Rosanna 
Garrison, Mary Kamber, Thelma Schulfer, Betty Gislason, Antonia Rago. 




LIFE-SAVERS 

BACK ROW — Dorothy Roberts, Virginia Larson, Elizabeth Mueller, Lucile Fairbairn, Rosanna 

Garrison, Thelma Schulfer, Mary Mat|asic, Grace McDowney, Helene deLhorbe. 

MIDDLE ROW — Hazel Taylor, Mildred Green, Lauretta Kotwicki, Rita McTigue, Gladys Fox, 

Eileen Baine, Frances Macy, 

FRONT ROW — Betty Gislason, Ada Sexauer, Antonia Rago, Marguerite Klein. 



Page Sixty-eight 




MEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

There may be only one man to every five-point-four girls in Normal, 
but no one would ever think so from the activities of the Men's Athletic 
Association. In addition to supporting the regular activities such as basket- 
ball, baseball, track, tennis and golf, it re-furnished the Men's Room; 
invited the whole school to a dance in the Arts gymnasium; gave one of the 
best assemblies of the year; sponsored a ping-pong tournament and an 
archery club, and completed the year with a banquet at which the letters 
were awarded. 

It took true leadership ability to run such a program, and Lloyd 
Mabbott, president; Phil Lewis, vice-president; Maurice Lawler, secretary; 
Maurice Swiryn, treasurer, and Glenn Armstrong, manager, with the able 
help of Mr. Brye and Mr. Kripner, proved that they had what it took. They 
carried out everything planned with an admirable spirit and vigor; so suc- 
cessful were they that their enthusiasm spread throughout the school, and 
the turnouts for games and tournaments were noticeably larger and louder. 

The M. A A., its officers and sponsors, wish to take this opportunity 
to thank the student body for their whole-hearted support of the athletic 
activities during the past year. 






Pag, Sixty- 




BASKETBALL 

The most popular game at Normal, from the spectator standpoint, is 
basketball, and deservedly so. The five that represented the school in the 
Conference this year exhibited a scrappy, never-know-when-they're-licked 
brand of ball that brought the students out in droves and sent them home 
glad they came. 

The team tied for second in the Conference and "thereby hangs a 
tale — ." Until January the mainstays were Captain Louie Cratch, Roy 
Buchanan, Maurice Swiryn, Jimmie Egan, "Fuzzy" Fasan, and Alex Tudy- 
man. At that time the first three became eligible, and hopes of finishing 
out of last place were very dark; but the silver lining showed up when the 
Freshman Class came up with three men, Solomon, Peterson, and Wolinski. 
These, with Flugel, Cross, Quinn, and Cleary, soon became Conference ma- 
terial and Normal entered the state Junior College Tournament. 

In the state tournament the first opponent was Morton, a team that 
had beaten the College five easily a few weeks before; we won by two 
points. Normal next beat a down-state school to make the semi-finals, 
La Grange took the team by a point and North Park took third away by 
three po : nts. Normal got a fourth; Egan, the capta'n, and Solomon, center, 
were selected on All-Star teams. 

Not a little of the credit for the season's success belongs to Lou e 
Cratch, one of the smartest basketball men this school has ever had; he 
assisted Mr. Kripner in coaching and was a big factor in the quick reor- 
ganization of the team. All together, in conference competition, and in 
practice games, the team won eighteen out of twenty-eight games played. 

The team has great hopes for next year and with a little luck will be 
among the top three at the end of the season; this is especially likely to be 
true if the student support continues at as high a standard as it has this year. 



Page Seventy 




BASEBALL 

Practice contests revealed much material for Normal's regular nine, 
and Coach Kripner and his aggregation of sluggers headed for a fine year 
on the diamond. The first game of the season with the strong Armour 
nine ended in a four to four tie after seven innings of very cold weather. 
In that game the team played heads-up ball and backed the pitching of 
Solomon, a newcomer who has a nice curve, with good hitting. The cold 
winds that swept over the railroad tracks and then wrapped themselves 
around the freezing players prevented a good showing by either team. 

Eighteen men are on the squad at present, including Capt. Smith, and 
Peterson, catchers; Solomon, Crashoff, Mabbott, H. Lawler, Shapero, and 
Loess, pitchers; Maloff, Egan, Kass, Cratch, Swiryn, and Perlstein, infielders; 
and Kruse, Silver, Flugel, and Zindel, outfielders. Because of the lack of 
material in the lower classes this year the team is composed of men from 
the whole school and is playing an independent schedule. Opponents will 
include Aurora, the University of Chicago, Morton, North Park, Joliet, and 
others in the Junior College Conference. 

Last year, under Capt. Smith, the team played a ten-game schedule, 
winning six and losing four. At times they did very well and at other times 
their work was faulty, but at all times they refused to quit, even though 
many runs behind. At Lisle, for instance, they were losing nine to one 
going into the eighth; they came out of it leading, and won the game. 

Under the capable leadership of Mr. Kripner and Capt. Smith, the team 
has enjoyed very successful competition. It is regrettable that the faculty 
does not have the time to attend the exciting games which are so numerous 
during the season. 



Pay i' Seventy-one 




TENNIS 
Eleven meets have been scheduled in the Conference tennis schedule 
by the Normal squad. This year, with a strong team, they expect to do 
better than last year. In the season's opener, at La Grange, they lost, three 
to two, by very close scores. Johnson, Fasan, Wigger, Armstrong, and Krup- 
sky are the present representatives of Normal on the courts. Mr. Griffin, 
coach, says they are good and will play to win. 

TRACK 

Last year the track team took third in the conference on two firsts by 
Captain Maravolo, a second and third by Weis, and a fourth by Swee. This 
year Maravolo will take care of the jumps; Weis, Quinn, and Cleary will 
enter in the dashes; Quinn and Tesmer are 440 men; Mehringer and Solo- 
mon are in the shot, discus, and javelin; Bell, Uber, and Kaplan are running 
the mile in fast time; Wolinski is the hurdler; and with Mr. Griffin and 
Johnny Piuppo coaching, the team seems to be going places. 




Page Seventy-two 




GOLF 

Although golf is not one of the major sports in junior college competi- 
tion, there has always been awarded to it one of the high places in Normal 
athletics. The men who represent the College in tournaments are Wolinski, 
Kruse, Moeller, Nelson, Walters, and Kaeding. The team, a scrappy one 
coached by Mr. Kripner, is one of the most promising squads Normal has 
had in a number of years. 

FOOTBALL 

For several semesters the number of men entering Normal has not 
been sufficient for a football team. The last team Normal had was in the 
Fall of 1932 under the leadership of Captain Mabbott. This picture is 
published because there has not been an Emblem since the team played 
and most of the men on it are still in school. Bob Gustavel and Johnny 
Piuppo coached this squad. 




Page Seventy-thi 



Page Seventy-four 



FEATURES 

HUMOR 

ADVERTISING 



THE MICRO-EYE AND -EAR 

"You are about to witness the testing of a great invention — the micro- 
eye and ear. Although we are many miles away we will focus on the front 
corridor of the Chicago Normal College on this morning in 1937 at 8:59 
in the morning. 

"Look! — there are Florence Beal, Evelyn Ferchoff, and Eleanor Irmen 
discussing Student Daily, while Mary Nolan, censor, is critically eyeing some 
remark about Mary Woodward. Catherine Toomey, Mildred Stehl, Minnie 
Langdell. and Esther Carber are nervously awaiting an interview with Mrs. 
Muller. Irma Filippi and Ruth Urban are posting the baseball schedule for 
the coming tournament. Across the corridor Genevieve Sowa and Gertrude 
Terwee are pinning the last few articles, including a picture of Fred Gunder- 
man, who is leading man in the coming play, on Little Theatre Bulletin. Just 
at this time M'riam Gershman, Alice McFarland, Lois Schuman, and Hazel 
Taylor dash by and frantically call to their section mates in a last vain at- 
tempt to get to Dr. Sherff's class on time. Pssss — Oh! a short circuit and 
we can see no more." 

CHEZ DALTON ET DOBB 

Marguerite Krafft, celebrated star of the American stage, opened her 
morning mail. Her face was relieved of its rather bored expression when 
she noticed — 

Chez Dalton et Dobb invite you to their advance showing of Fashions 
of the Hour. 

Calling to Alice O'Shea, her masseuse, she began preparation for the 
style show. 

Five o'clock, and Madame Krafft entered the exclusive salon on Fifth 
Avenue. She joined her friends, Irene Liszt, concert pian : st, and Ethel 
Steinberg of the Metropolitan Opera Company just as the curtain opened. 
The first scene was the ideal Cocktail Hour. Grace Dunn in a crimson 
hostess gown was dispensing hospitality to Dorothy Horrocks. Dorothy was 
dressed in gray bengaline with chinchilla and Betty Cowell in black velour 
with silver fox. The last ensemble appealed greatly to Amalia Monaco, 
distinguished hostess, who indicated to Madame Dalton that she wished to 
purchase the gown. 

A scene that aroused much interest was a series of sports tableaux. 
Ruth Kennedy, renowned parachute jumper, modeled an appropriate cos- 
tume for flying; Marjorie Newlands, Edna Sonken, and Margaret Clinch, 
swimming and diving stars, displayed the latest in beach wear; Marilyn 
Ferguson, Mildred joens, tennis doubles champions, modeled the acme in 
ccmfort for the courts; Dorothy Johnson and Mary McMahon, winner and 
runner-up in the Women's National Open Tournament exhibited smart 
golf-wear. Myrtle Lynch, Grace Martinek, and Josephine McGrath, promi- 
nent debutantes of the season, bought clothes for their favorite sports fol- 
lowing the examples of this exhibit. Madame Krafft, having completed her 
arrangements for the fitting of a salmon pink formal, ordered her about- 
the-town car and with dignity swept from the room. 

Page Seventy-six 



EXTRA! EXTRA! 

"Opponents Engage in Hand to Hand Battle" ran the headlines in 
Chicago's leading newspapers! The rivals in the most exciting mayoralty 
campaign in years were both women — which, no doubt, explains the excite- 
ment. Olive May Wilhelms and Josephine McCrath were the aspiring young 
politicians. The latter was a Democrat and was sponsored by Margaret 
O'Brien and Mary O'Connor, ward bosses, and by Ruth O'Connor, editor of 
one of the Hearst newspapers. Olive May Wilhelms, Republican, was the 
"fair-haired girl" of the American Legion, and was also being backed by 
the owners of the stockyards, Eugenia Shea and Florence Westermeyer. 

The president of Normal, Elaine Skelton, refused to commit herself, 
but Isabelle Pozer, head of the League of Women Voters, denounced both 
of the candidates as tools of the capitalists. Beatrice Kramer, chairman of 
the board of directors of the First National Bank, poured money into the 
campaign funds of both parties. 

It was a close fight. On election day, news from the polls was awaited 
eagerly by both groups. Josephine Nohelty and Mary Simpson, Democratic 
and Republican campaign managers, were anxious. And, finally, the long 
expected results! "Lucille Rice, Socialistic candidate, wins by a landslide." 
She was sponsored by the school teachers of Chicago, and three of them — 
Frances Rudy, Marion Riordan, and Mary Roy — formed her brain trust. 

Three cheers for education!!! 



WHO'LL BE WHAT AT NORMAL IN '36 

Herein lies the prediction of the Three Little Pigs as to "Who'll be 
What at Normal in '36" — Do you agree? 

Little theatre will be presided over by Lenore Drury with Evelyn Clazer 
as vice-president. Virgie Harmon will be the chairman of the Book-Ex- 
change committee and will be relieved at various times by Morris Solomon 
and Rose Davis. Betty Sundmacher will be President of Student Council 
and will have as her vice-president Ruth Duff. Glenn Armstrong will be 
the tennis champion of the school and will have defeated as runners-up 
Evener Craig, Lillian Bencur, and Martha Boiling. The Savage girls, Eve'yn 
and Louise, will be Dr. Smith's most dependable animal care-takers. The 
Student Daily will have as its editor Gertrude Roy with a staff cons'sting 
of Joel Walters, Olga Yrmoluk, Felicia Pacelli and Ruth Porter. The Geog- 
raphy Club will be directed by Rachel Rosen and Julia Giles. Florence Wia- 
duck will be president of her class. The chief equestrian will be Walter 
Johnson, who will have as companions Margaret Johnson, Margaret Fitzgib- 
bons, Robert Cleary, and Edward Quinn. Jane Hobbs will be Social Hour 
chairman, with Eileen Levander, Marguerite Klein, Libuse Baitel, Kathryn 
Bonfield, Elizabeth Fosse, Charles Kolar, Roland Loess, Ernest Mehringer, 
Knute Peterson, and John Prendergast as assistants. 

Page Seventy-seven 



Page Seventy-eight 



TEA FOR TWO 

"It's really fun working in this very exclusive tea-room on Michigan 
Blvd. Why, only this afternoon I saw Rosemary Dushek entertaining Mary 
Ellen Cahill, Martha Boiling, Matty Elaine Gilbert, Dolores Hurney, Anna 
Keating, and Mary Leyden. I understand that Rosemary announced her 
engagement at the party." 

"Oh, really — how grand! But do you ever see or hear anything about 
those old fraternity fellows? You know, Julius S'lverman, Edward Switzer, 
Henry Tessmer, Lawrence Turner, and — Oh, who are the rest?" 

"Yes, I remember. Let's see, there's August Flugel, John Wallace, 
Bennie Wolinsky. and — " 

"And for heaven's sake, don't forget Fred Gunderman." 

"They were in here last night after the theatre. They certainly are 
"men about town" now and the fraternity is still in existence. They're 
planning on giving a cabaret party in the upstairs ballroom next Saturday 
night. It's going to be quite an affair I guess. lola Bright, Helen Dob- 
linsky, Marcella Fefer, Bernice Kuellmer, and Joanna Lombardo are among 
the girls that are going to come." 

"I wonder if a poor soul like me could barge in on an affair like that. 
I'd just love to see some of the girls again." 

"Well, here's your chance because here comes Yvonne Van Lent and 
lona Pronger. You know they are both modeling at Fairway's Department 
Store. I hear Evelyn Knoppel is starting to work there tomorrow." 

"And speaking of models — Eleanor Harris, Evelyn Hauser, Emilie Utteg, 
and Mary Kamber are doing commercial posing at Sak's Fifth Avenue. Oh, 
but my dear, it's almost four o'clock and I have an appointment at four- 
fifteen. I can rely on you, then, for making the arrangements for tea on 
Tuesday? Will you make place cards for Harriet Wilson, Dorothy Roberts, 
Marie Love, Gladys Olson, Mildred Cohen, and Hazel Taylor? I'd like your 
French pastry specialties for dessert — the rest I'll leave to you — " 

RAMBLINCS OF A DIM WIT 

For no reason at all, particular individuals create certain irrelevant 
images in one's mind. Be that a psychological principle or not, doesn't 
much matter. Just for amusement, however, allow your well-disciplined 
mind to wander, and see if your unconscious thoughts compare with curs: 
June Rades, daisies in a blue vase on a sunny window sill . . . Lois Bruckner, 
a prettily pouting child . . . Gertrude Riordan, stars in a dark sky . . . Helen 
Youngreen, a stimulating winter wind . . . Eleanor Young, room 1 8A . . . 
Iggie Anziferoff, gypsy fires on a Russian steppe . . . Ted Sunko, protractor 
and compass . . . Virginia Henaghan, an Irish jig . . . Alfhild Molander, a 
ski slide shadowed by dark pines . . . Lucille Walp, starched white linen 
. . . Clarence Bell, a brief case . . . Elvera Streisinger, conversation on a street 
car . . . Mildred Erickson, notebooks . . . Rochelle Pritzker, crisp lettuce 
and red tomatoes . . . Ada Sexauer, charts and graphs . . . Andrew Moore, 
neutral colored tweed. 

Page Seventy-mine 



What we like about these people: 

Ann Rita Kelly's devastating indifference, 

Marge Wilson's smile, 

James Jabrosky's obliging willingness, 

Bill Poore's character dancing, 

Stephanie Kara's name, 

Mary Leahy's Irish wit, 

Miriam Allen's earnestness, 

Jeanne Collins' voice, 

Mary Byrne's cool good looks, 

Dorothy Schnabel's efficiency, 

Tom Deacy's way with the ladies, 

Robert Reinsch's ability to enjoy himself, 

Nick Maravolo's inscrutability, 

The breadth of John Yara and Leroy Pfister, 

Louie Cratch's basketball technique, 

Maurie Swiryn's dancing, 

Alex Tudyman's intriguing reserve. 

Dear Diary: 

Stasia Hayman and I were riding to school this morning when we 
started discussing people we know. The members of our class are really 
quite interesting. Take Miriam Dierkes, for instance. She comes from 
Oak Park every morning, works at Field's sometimes, studies occasionally, 
enjoys herself tremendously, and still keeps up her good looks as well as 
her athletic interests. She is an excellent boatman. Valeria Molseed suc- 
cessfully combines personal charm with intelligence. Mary Liz Townsend 
and Margaret Trudeau are very much alike, possessing the same kind of 
prettiness and dramatic ability. Joe Portle is amazingly capable; people 
vote him into all kinds of offices because of his genuine reliability. William 
Sturgeon is one of those rare men who blush, Frances Curtin is a UT who 
actually wants to know what's going on, and Chester Dobrzynski, we de- 
cided, is a man with his own will. 

Today was Normalite deadline. When I went down to give Ruth Hor- 
lick my editorial, Mary Ann Kielbasa, Anne Matanky, Dorothy Been, Paul 
Enrietto, and Chesna Cohen were all there, writing very vociferously. (Get 
the implication?) Little Theatre was holding another rehearsal, so I stopped 
a while to watch Sally Seitz, Helene Quast, Bill Wigger, and Jean Sandahl 
putting the polish on a clever piece, before going home to plan the Student 
Daily for tomorrow. I hope it's as good as Lucille Schaffer's, but yet escapes 
the scissors of Censor Loraine Malmberg. Evelyn Schwartz phoned to check 
up on that committee I'm on — she's so efficient that I feel ashamed. Evelyn 
Olson, too, is like that and still she's a very pleasant, likable person. I'm 
getting sleepy, so goodnight, little book. 

Page Eight 11 




Page Eighty-one 



What a Hall Guard Sees: 

Catherine McCafferty and Jane Bevan strolling to Sketch Club. Martha 
Ericson scurrying to Student Council. Ruth Cohn sauntering out to lunch. 
Now Gertrude McGuire passes, surrounded by Tommy O'Dowd, Emmett 
Gartland, and Russell Griffin. Hearing an ear-splitting shriek from above, 
we turn to see Joan Scully tumbling down the stairs with aluminum bird 
patterns and mimeographed sheets fluttering after her. An agonized moan 
penetrates the door of a room near by, and we rush in to find that Linnea 
Lindquist has unsuspectingly sat upon a primary reading chart prepared with 
hours of toil by Laura Pierce and Rita Youngerman. "Ooh, my dress!" 
cries Linnea. 

"You unfeeling brute' Not your dress, but our chart has been ruined," 
howl the other two. We qu etly withdraw as letter stamps and bottles of 
printer's ink beg n to fly through the air. 

Dashing hurriedly around the corner we find ourselves in the midst of 
Irving Silver and Roy Buchanan on the way to their subterranean lockers. 
Extricating ourself, we hasten to return to our post, which we find now in 
the possession of Dominic Nuccio, Elizabeth Brown, Sara O'Brien, Hilbert 
Stewart, and Baraba Jane Clark, who seem to be holding an open forum on 
anything anyone wants to argue about. At the approach of Dr. Blount. 
however, the group vanishes in the atmosphere. 

When we are again seated, concentrating on last month's "Screen" 
magazine, we are once more disturbed, this time by the spectacle of Marion 
Jayne Watson, hair disheveled, with glazed, unseeing eyes. She mumbles, 
"So Titty Mouse jumped over the stile, and Tatty Mouse jumped over the 
stile, and then Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse — ." Her voice fades as she 
ascends the stairs, still in her curious trance. 

With a whoop, Ada Brown sails past on her roller skates, Helen Hayes 
closely pursuing her. Carolyn Crystal shrieks after them, "But why do I 
always have to serve on refreshment committees?" Myrtle Thorsen, Mary 
Ronan, Isabelle Stevenson, and Dorothy Thullen succeed in quieting these 
exhuberant classmates of theirs so that they may have a peaceful atmos- 
phere in which to prepare their panel discussion on "Physical Education for 
the Under-privileged Child." Eva Basara and Rae Chanenson are on their 
way to Mr. Hatfield's children's literature class, judging from the books they 
carry, when they are stopped by the antics of "Uncle Fred" Anderson and 
Walter Brenke, who are dueling for the honor of being May King's first 
attendant. Bill Hermes, with Marge Landis, look on in horror, while Frank 
Jewett and Betty Lou Bills clap their hands in gleeful applause. Roger Frantz 
puts an end to the terrific slaughter with a i'ittle arbitration, and the corri- 
dors resume their wonted air of dignity. 

Then the bell rings. 
Page Eighty-two 



REPORTER INTERVIEWS JUNETTA JUNIOR 

Seriously, Junetta Junior examined her olive and nut on whole wheat 
as she squirmed uneasily in her booth at Miller's. "Well", she welled, "I 
feel it would be sort of treason, as it were, if you get my point — ' 

"Oh, but not at all," said I, firmly. "Publicity is good for anyone. You 
don't feel that your class ought to be left out of the Annual, do you ? " 

"If you never tell a soul I told you," she breathed, "I guess it will be 
all right. But people's private lives — " 

"Come now, no stalling. I want information. Let's start with Harold 
Winegar." 

"Did you know he leads a double life? By night he plays in an orchestra 
in a tavern. Yes, actually — he does his thinking on the way to school. Lillian 
Anderson, Alice McCarthy, Clarice Lee, and Thelma Lundgren forget their 
inhibitions in strenuous athletics. I guess Elinor Elisberg's main joy in life is 
activity. Her energy is astoundng. That striking Leona Stein, with Ed Uber 
and Harriet jacobsen, devotes all her extra time to Little Theatre. Lucille 
Sullivan and Carol Wise delight in working on committees, and Ada Blake- 
way doesn't. Lucille's such a comforting person. Carl Welin specializes in 
the social life. Please, can't I stop? That should be enough." 

"If you don't go on," I threatened, "I might happen to mention your 
real name, merely because of lack of material, don't you know?" 

"Oh, very well," as she cowered against the wall, "I may as well be 

hanged for a sheep as a lamb, as spoke the Prophet Lillian Friedman 

really enjoys her duties as president of Fellowship, Coralie Wilkes herself 
will tell you anything you want to know, and J. Curtis Glenn is understood 
by his wife — she inspires his accordion outbursts. Normalite couldn't be 
published without Sarah Jane Caddick. Mary Leonard's self-possession and 
stage presence are the envy of everyone, and, if you want to know a real 
secret, Jimmy Egan's sweet disposition is the real cause of his popularity. 
Betty Cislason is awfully obliging, as is Colomba Zerega, who is, incidentally, 
also terrifically active. Rosanna Garrison's carefully concealed hobby is draw- 
ing. . . .Here comes Alyss DeMarais. She mustn't see me with you; it would 
be disastrous." And with these words, Junetta stealthily crept out the back 
door. 

SPECIALTIES 

Gustava Carter orange nut bread 

Isabel Goscicki judicial execution 

Genevieve Graber personality 

Ethel Grosse collars and cuffs 

Mildred May grins 

Esther Mies offices 

Lucille Murray permanents 

Rita McTigue dimples 

Eleanor Nash tangos 

Beatrice Schaffer ripping 

Margaret Taheny brimmed hats 

Page Eighty-three 



NORMAL SlD^SHpW 




yeaV^?" 



Page Eiglilihh 



POEM 

Bielenberg went walking on a fine spring day, 
Carroll was talking in a very silly way; 
Degan smiled so sweetly that all could see 
That her friend Gen. Fahey was coming to tea. 
Gustafson is a lady who is very well known, 
And Hynes just devours Southern corn pone. 
Kravitz is the man in the salt and pepper suit, 
And Nordblad is the backbone of our institute. 
Roach is not an insect but everybody's pal, 
Marion Smith is a most intelligent gal; 
Turner is known for her way with gents 
But excuse us please — this is all nonsense. 

EARLY MORNING IN SPRING 

"Wait'll I tell you the funny dream I had as I slept on the 'L' this 
morning," cried Cecelia McGough to Elizabeth Bard, Jacob Knaizer, Eliza- 
beth Vogelei, John Gross, and Katherine Geiger. 

Cecelia continued with, "It was strange. Little Bo-Peep Callahan was 
weeping about her lost sheep when Simple Simon Osterman sat down beside 
her and growled, 'Fee, fo, fi, fum!' Then Old Mother Quintana rode up on 
her broom stick, followed by the black sheep Edith Bernstein, Genevieve 
Larson, Mary Agnes Mulvihill, Beatrice O'Connor, Margaret O'Donnell, 
Lilamae Murray, and Harriet Shure. Their expressions were a sight to be- 
hold. Little Boy Blue Rehder laughed and laughed until an Ogress roared, 
'Is that exactly in keeping with your professional attitude?' Before this 
awful blast they all melted away, and I sank through the ground till I found 
myself sliding down the glass hill which Alice Cook, Margaret Lee, and 
Angela Lemna were attempting to climb. Margaret Clyne, Shirley Jean 
Latham, Martha Macku, and Rose Shift were chanting, 'Sing a song of six- 
pence,' when Dorothy Frankel sighed, 'It's always tea-time here.' Adele 
Ignowski and Jennie Landa joined hands and screamed across the water at 
Muriel Shely and Dorcee Branson, who became very red and suddenly meta- 
morphosed into little radishes. Also in this garden were Delia Cesaria, 
Phyllis Ebert, Adeline Bodian. and Mary Rita Davis, the blushing roses; Rose 
Boland, Mamie Zaretsky, and Frances Macy, bouncing Bets; Margaret Hef- 
fernan and Frances Barre, field daisies; and a few pansies. Dancing on the 
green were John Nelson, Ed Kubik, Leo Zindel, Joe Bucaro, Bernard Schapero, 
William Weis, and William Kaplan, blithely led by Harry J. Lawler. Through 
this mesa wandered Allen Kruse and Betty Sunmacher, babes in the wood 
running away from the ogress, who cried, 'Off with their heads!' Morrie 
Beitman and Maurice Maloff, in medieval armor, hastened to obey her com- 
mand. ... I woke up as Jessie Shults screamed, '69th Street! End of the 
Line'!" 

Page Eighty-five 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 

Helen Anderson wills the task of making posters to Mary O'Malley. 

Jeannette Anderson leaves samples from her hope chest to Mildred Ross. 

Mildred Bagy and Eileen Casey abdicate as court jesters to Byrne and Lewis 

Marion Bertossa leaves her Rock Island pass to Alice Costin. 

Marie Casey leaves her good nature to Ruth Hopkins. 

Dorothy Chesler leaves her conscience to Ed. Scharbach. 

Dorothy Dietrich leaves her scouring power to Muriel Dodd. 

Winnie Erickson leaves many positions unfilled. 

Sylvia Goldman leaves her "sunny disposition" to Ray Crasshof. 

Louise Gray bestows upon Lucille Walp her undying energy. 

Marie Hahn donates her fiery blushes to Jane Bevan. 

Ethel Helander leaves her practical jokes to Joe Twomey. 

Lillian Kaczmarski bequeaths her good nature to Eleanore Young. 

Flemmie Lancianese contributes her voice to Alvah Armstrong. 

Betty Likas leaves Dan Lynch to Mazie Rabig. 

Mary McCullough gives her saddle to Kay Imhahn. 

Viola McDaniel leaves her gestures to Helen Marie Murphy. 

Viola McDonnell leaves her Joan Crawford style to Grace MacDowney. 

Catherine McNellis contributes her sense of responsibility to Margaret Harris. 

Helen Nash bequeaths her mascara to Hazel Whalen. 

Frances Neitz donates her dignity to Helen Marie Kelley. 

Marion Normoyle and Marion Swensek bestow their timidity upon Mamie 

Laitchin. 
Lucille Polley leaves her political aspirations to Rosanne Schatzman. 
Molly Raider commits her Russian songs to Al Kosloff. 
Marge Robertson donates her "formals" to Bunny Spain. 
Viola Warren bequeaths her orchids to Judith Carroll. 
Ethel Washington gives her gym suit to Ruth Ryder. 



PROPHECY 
I see in the crystal, that — 

Agnes Azzarello and Dorothy Rietz will be aviators. Josephine LaPlaca 
and Naomi Stein are destined to become a song and dance team. Rudell 
Cox will move furniture. Mary Chandler's name will become known as that 
of a press agent for movie stars, among them Marjorie Winslow and Anna 
Mackin. Dorothy McCormick will publish books — the love stories of Lucille 
McKeag. Helen Baldry and Betty Williamson will be business executives, 
and Lillian Miransky will sing in grand opera. Doris Martin's portrait in 
her Olympic costume will be painted by Evelyn Schiesser, famous artist. 
Marian Panko will model "formals" designed by the firm of Goldman and 
Garel. Florence Cohen, as a crime detector, will solve the mysteries of the 
age And Helen de Lhorbe will be a school teacher. 



Page Eighty-six 



. The WORLD BOOK 

ENCYLOPEDIA 




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The WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA 

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Page Eighty-8 



REMINISCENCES 
It was October. 1936, and the Olympiad at Berlin was a thing of the 
past. But not for Mrs. Cochran and Mr. Kripner — not when some of their 
proteges had made such outstanding records. 

Mary Pratscher. Lauretta Kotwicki, Millie Williams, and Carmela 
Petrone had broken all previous records in the women's relay. In the low 
hurdles Dot Davidson and Irene Ral came through with new records. "Lindy" 
had put the shot for an unequalled distance, almost hitting Virginia Kent. 
First and second place in the high hurdles were taken by Mary Tullock and 
Esther Hicks. 

In the water events Mildred Greene won first in the back stroke, and 
Agnes Crosche's first in the 100 yard free style brought the United States 
points. 

Loyal rooters for the United States — and incidentally Normal's — 
Olympic team were Howard Beasley, Si Kass, Dot Blyth, Bill Everson, Gladys 
Fox, Alma Grimmich, Maurice Lawler, Bill Moeller, Helen Peacock, and 
Marvin Perlstein. At a party in a "biergarten," among those present were 
Mr. and Mrs. Swee, Millie Sika, Walter Smith, and Thelma Schulfer. Lloyd 
Mabbott had organized the "brawl" and Vince Conroy was the life of the 
party. 

MUSICAL FANTASY 

Jennie Balhouse hummed "Penthouse Serenade" because she and Vir- 
ginia King "We're in the Money." "Let's Have a Party" cried Lorayne 
Carroll and Ruth Olson, but Grace Henning and Sylvia Malter both shrieked 
"I Love a Parade," so they compromised on "Louisiana Hayride." Virginia 
Barton and Ruth Heffernan each wore "An Alice Blue Gown." Walter 
Fasan whispered a "Cheerful Little Earful" to Ernelle Carlson while "Orchids 
Bloom in the Moonlight." It was "Darkness on the Delta;" Eileen Keena 
and Albert Brooks began to do the "Carioca." Meanwhile Harry Osterherdt 
murmured "You Have Taken My Heart" to Louise Barzan, who answered 
"Let's Fall in Love." Betty Lou Bills and Robert Kaeding planned "A Little 
Grass Shack," but Sara Dearborn and Lillian Yoelin preferred a "Little 
Dutch Mill." 

It was "One Minute to One" when Josephine Dunne said, "Let's Make 
Hay While the Sun Shines," so Dorothea Epstein and Blanche Hughes went 
home to "Spin a Little Web of Dreams." Helen Price and Virginia Larson 
harmonized on "Au Revoir, Pleasant Dreams;" and Lois Purcell and Vera 
Spikula, "Going to Heaven on a Mule," caroled "I Gotta Get Up and Go to 
Work." Edythe Weidenaar and Irma Widman repaired the "Wagon 
Wheels." Everyone went home singing "It's a Great Life if You Don't 
Weaken." 

Page Eighty-eight 




Pa ye Eighty-nine 



OFFICIAL 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

FOR 

THE EMBLEM 
1934 



Marshall Studio 

140 North State Street 



THE UNIVERSITY IN WHICH A SPIRIT 

OF HELPFULNESS PERMEATES 

EVERY CLASSROOM 

DE PAUL UNIVERSITY 

CHICAGO 
Summer Session June 26 to August 4 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



College of Liberal Arts School of Music 

Col'ege of Law Department of Drama 

College of Commerce Secretarial Department 



"Special attention given to Normal College gradu- 
ates who wish to complete degree requirements" 



For information address the Registrar 



^Paul 



UNIVERSITY 

64 East Lake Street Chicago, Illinois 



Page Ninety-one 



LITERATURE LIGHTS 

Agatha Dunne and Florence Arm n respectfully submit to your notice 
the list cf their stock in trade of June. 1934. 

DETECKATIF STORIES 
Buza. "Bloody Murder;" Conley, "Help Police!;" Collins, "Hollywood 
Hanging;" Fairbairn, "Spot X;" Hoffman, "Sorority Queen." 

LOVE STORIES 
Casey, "Loves of Marge Delaney;" Fitzgerald, "Rings on Her Fingers;" 
Wiborg, "Her Man;" Flan'gan, "The Early Bird;" Frisbie and Cray, "Sweet 
and Petite." 

DRAMA 
Davey, "How to Act;" Wallace, "Peter the Great;" Mann, "Hit Pro- 
ducing;" Titelbaum, "Normal to Broadway;" Farrell, "Impersonation as 
an Art." 

SPORTS 
Mueller, "Music vs. Swimming;" Levinson, "Baseball Stars;" Burd, 
"Five Points to Croquet;" Kelliher, "How to Tackle." 

TOPICS OF THE DAY 
Lipofsky, "Intelligence in 10 Lessons;" Burke, "How to Be Popular;" 
McCann, "Life as a Boy Scout;" Chaitkin, "Communism;" Lowe, "Hi-de- 
Ho;" Rice, "The Chinese Food;" Draine, "The Science of Notebooks." 

HUMOR 
Rosenf.eld and O'Connor, "Music of Mathematics;" Wimby, "Life of 
Whimpy;" Lewis, "Colfin' Be Cay;" Knudtzon, "Nuts to You." 

CIRCUS DAY 

June 1940, and the circus was in town. Eileen Baine, Loretta Francis, 
Eleanor Moore, and Berenice Mayor, tired school teachers, approached the 
ticket booth. To their surprise Charlotte Adler, Lil Lipschultz, and Lil 
Astrachan were acting as "barkers" and ticket agents. Entering the side- 
shows they were confronted with the spectacle of Louise Herst and Marion 
Kostow — living skeletons; Mavis Blackwell, fat lady; Fred Manz, wild man 
from Borneo; Mary Ciloolly and Anne Reim, sword swa'lowers and fire 
eaters; Cutie Fermier, Hootcha Hanson, and Dolly Thompson, muscle dancers 
extraordinaire; and Grace Mulhern, charming snakes. 

The show opened with a trapeze and tumbling troupe including Mary 
Dcnoghue, Peg Dwyer, Fran Maloney, Mung O'Connell, Peg Lalor, Mary 
McDonnell, and Grace Renshaw. The ringmaster, Claudia )ackson, next 
introduced her trained seals — Mary Matjasic and Bea Penn ; ngton. The 
shew was climaxed by the bareback riders, Jane Johnson and Mercedes 
Harmon Following Mae Neely's thrilling an'mal act Davida Scher played 
the calliope while Helen Peterson did a rushing business in peanuts. 

Page Ninety-two 



TELEPHONE MIDWAY 3935 



CLARKE- McELROY 

PUBLISHING COMPANY 



"School Printers' 



6140 COTTAGE GROVE AVENUE 
CHICAGO 



^PUBLISHERS ^ 
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PRINTERS OF THE EMBLEM 



Paqc Xinctii-tln 



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ntensive 3 month's course^^ 

Shorthand and Typing 

For College Trained People 



New students are rece'ved for this course any Monday in our 
Loop School. Our regular tuition fees are charged for this course. 
This is an opportunity open to Chicago Normal College students 
to qualify in the shortest possible time and at a minimum expense. 



You are invited to call for a personal interview 

METROPOLITAN BOSINESS COLLEGE 

37 South Wabash Ave. Phone Randolph 2637 
Chicago, Illinois. 



What a Dietician Ought to Know 

about 




ACCEPTED BY THE AMERICAN 

MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 
Special methods of preparation, 
bottling and delivery enable 
retention in high degree the 
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flavor of peel, fruit 
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twentieth of one per 
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Orange Crush 

A Carbonated Beverage 
or Still Drink 

One 6 oz. drink of Orange-Crush supplies the 
same food value in terms of calories as a banana, 
two oranges, a bowl of oatmeal, a dish of spinach, 
or a fried chicken leg according to Dr. Wm. D. 
McNally. This well known food authority is a 
member of the American Medical Association. 
Experiments with guinea pigs conducted by Eliza- 
beth M. Koch and F. C. Koch, Department of 
Physiological Chemistry and Pharmacology, Uni- 
versity of Chicago, proved that the Vitamin C 
content of Orange-Crush syrup is kept equal in 
quality to that of fresh oranges for months. 

ORANGE-CRUSH COMPANY 
318 West Superior Street Chicago 



OUR LAST WONTS 

Virginia Blyth won't write term papers anymore. 

Marie Brennan, Leah Lindenberg, and Adelaide Nichols won't ride on the 

"L" again. 
Betty Butler won't commute. 

Amy Claras and Bessie Smith won't do natural dancing. 
Dorothy Eirich, Betty Harnden, and Charline Snider won't worry over Nor- 

malite assignments. 
Mary Finan, Dorothy Lembach, and Kay Mulhern won't go to Social Hour. 
Frances Fiscelle and Emily Flosi won't harmonize. 
Clara Klomhaus won't read John Dewey. 
Billie Kuglin won't bowl for Normal. 
Anne Levin and Tony Rago won't stay single. 
Ruth Lundgren won't play volley ball. 

Mildred Marano and Lucille Williams won't carry brief cases. 
Cen. Rabig and Helen Zimmerman won't be together. 
Helen Regan, Virginia Rohen, and Ruth Van Dervelde won't eat lunch at 

Miller's. 
Willa Wendt won't compete in Normal's swimming meets. 
Gertrude Warren won't be with her shadow. 
Esther Pallin won't blow her pitchpipe. 

BULLETIN— TEACHERITE SCHOOL 

This select young ladies' establishment offers a superior course in gen- 
eral culture. The principal, Mrs. Sosna, is well known, as is her assistant, 
Bailey Bishop. Alva Loveless heads the gym department. Rita Maher is in 
charge of dancing, and Sarah Scott heads tennis. Midge Landis has as her 
aides in the philosophical department Elizabeth Lewis, Gertrude Graf, and 
Irma Davis. Isabelle Thomson teaches embroidery, Ruth Hopkins, bread- 
making, and Mildred Neuffer, coquetry. 

Teacherite emphasizes the arts. Carolyn McLaughlin's music, Marie 
McKillip's elocution, Dorothy Dodge's etiquette, and Catherine McNellis' 
china painting are essential to the well-educated young woman. Elsie Fried- 
man and Elizabeth Simonton lecture alternately on clothes and cosmetics. 

For summer students, Teacherite maintains a camp. Margaret Condon 
is chief counsellor, Lillian Lehman superintends tea-raising, and Dorothy 
Goller is the director of bees and butterflies. 

Come to Teacherite and learn right. 

Kay Jansson, Publicity Manager. 

NO TIME OFF FOR GOOD BEHAVIOR! PRACTICE ROMANCE 

With five months' work before us I've been married off by a hundred men (?) 

Before we reach our goal Quite without love and kisses. 

We graduate with honors — Instead, by school boys' persistent way 

The Seniors on Parole! Of calling each teacher, "Mrs." 

Says Campus Clarice: "I'm afraid that I'll never learn anything in golf class. 
I just waste my time puttering around." 

I'uf/r Ninety-five 



NORMAL COLLEGE 
LUNCHROOM 

WHOLESOME FOOD 
CONGENIAL SURROUNDINGS 
EFFICIENT SERVICE 

Margaret). Moulton, Manager. 













IT'S WISE 






TO BUY 








SUNKIST 


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Shields Avenue 


Boulevard 7670 




* 

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EARL 


BROWN'S 


ORCHESTRA 




MUSIC FURNISHED 






FOR ALL OCCASIONS 






(The Five 


T's) 






Tunes That Tickl 


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Address 




Phone 


6827 So. Mar 


shfield Ave. 




Prospect 7124 



The upper class of 1936 takes this oppor- 
tunity to express their faith in education. 
For education alone will make for a social 
order that is the hope of society. 



Page Ninety-, 



DO YOU REMEMBER AWAY BACK WHEN 
THERE WERE REALLY MTV 



LOST HERO 
I liked you! 
I don't know why. 
You did more 
Than coldly pass me by. 
You said, "Hello" 
In a non-committal way. 
It gave me a thrill 
But it didn't pay. 
It hurt. 

You had many a predecessor, 
You'll have many a follower too. 
You're just another fancy 
That didn't come true. 
I look at you now, 
More critical I be! 
And find you amusing — 
Just another MT. 

Lamenting Lou 



LAMENTING LOU 
I read last week in your column 
Of the sorrows of a maid, 
Of her boasted recovery, 
Of her illusions frayed. 

I thought this over deeply, 
And I couldn't help but see 
That he, lost lamented hero 
Could be no one else but me. 

The reason for my decision 
Most shyly I'll reveal; 
I know of no other IA 
That has my sex appeal. 

But cheer up, pretty maiden, 
I take pity on your plight; 
If you want to join my admirers, 
The line forms to the right. 

Don Juan, the IA 



Reprinted from the Normalite. 



EVENTUALLY 
Little boners, now and then, 
Will come off a student's pen. 
And though on tests they don't score high, 
They'll be printed by and by. 
• 

Five: What was the matter with the 
school you practiced at? 

Six: Aw, it wasn't the school, it was the 
principal of the thing! 



who sang, "River, stay 'way 
from my door" evidently forgot about the 
big, bad wolf. 



Mr. Eilert: When does the period of 
learning take place the fastest? 

Student: After a warning. 
• 

Sez Normal Norma: The difference be- 
tween bed sheets and mimeograph sheets 
is that you cover the bed with the first 
kind and the floor with the other. 



Four: Why is a woman entering an empty 
street car like a Normal co-ed learning to 



skate? 

Five 



ly, they both take a 



Page Ninety-eight 



Fisher Ice Cream Co. 

Wholesale Manufacturers of 

ICE CREAM AND ICES 

Telephones — Austin 2525 — Village 6867 
500 North Boulevard 
OAK PARK, ILLINOIS 



Eat at the Drug Store 

JODAR AND STUGKEY 

69th and Stewart Ave. 




MILLERS FOUNTAIN 

LUNCH 
AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

It Pleases Us to Please You 
350 W. 69th St. Englewood 9814 



Page Ninety-nit 





SPEEDWRITING 

is the SHORTHAND 






that qua 
weeks. 


lifies beginners to take rapid dictation in 
Not a machine. 


6-8 




LOW TUITION 


DEMONSTRATION DAILY 


BOTH 


SEXES 


CHICAGO BUSINESS COLLEGE 

190 North State Street Franklir 


i 4122-3-4-5 



Compliments of 

SHERLOCK BROTHERS 

5440 Wentworth Avenue 
Distributors of Quality Confections 



Business Phone: Canal 5253 Residence: Vincennes 


10304 


FRED LA MANTIA 




WHOLESALE 




FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 




Hotels, Restaurants, Institutions and Hospitals Supplied 




62 South Water Market 





WENDELL & COMPANY 

31 North State Street 
Chicago Normal College Sole Official Jewelers 



Page One Hundred 



LOWER JUNIORS 
OFFER YOU 

WISHES OF 
EVERY JOY 
RIGHT THRU 

JUST DO 

UNDERSTAND THAT 

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None-Such products satisfy the epi- 
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Ask your Independent Merchant for 
None-Such Food Products and be as- 
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Durand-McNeil- 
Horner Co. 

Importers, Manufacturers and 

Wholesale Grocers 
251 E. Grand Ave., Chicago, III. 



CASE & MOODY 
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"For the Best" 

Wood and Walnut Streets 

Seeley 3424 



Page One Hundred Oh 



WE TOOK ZOOLOGY FROM DR. SMITH 
TO A SILK WORM 
You wormy, squirmy, wiggley thing, 
You'll never know the pain you bring. 
You have given me some shocks, 
When I missed you from your box; 
For I did have a horrified hunch 
You might have strayed into my lunch. 
Indeed it was quite some relief, 
To find you asleep beneath the leaf. 
Never will I be satisfied. 
Till you're safely in formaldehyde; 
For then at last will I be free — 
I fear you're not the pet for me. 

Zoo-ridden 400 

Miss Gildemeister Disillusioned Us as to Our Vocal Capacity 
MONOTONE LULLABY 

Her babe she could not lull to sleep, 
When nightly it did moan; 
She had to let it weep, because 
She was a monotone. 

Emile's Sophia 

A FINAL ROMANCE 
Longingly he gazed at her. 
He wondered if she knew 
He'd had to take a chance — 
The time was nearly through. 

He moved a little closer; 
He tapped her on the arm; 
He just would have to ask her; 
It couldn't do any harm. 

He took the fatal step; 
She answered clear and true, 
And now you know the story 
Of how he passed in Zoo. 

Nuthatch 

Material on this page was reprinted from the 

Normal ite through the courtesy of the 

UPPER SENIOR CLASS 



Payr One Hundred Two 



THREE MONTHS' COURSE 

FOR COUEGE STUDENTS AND GRADUATES 

A thorough, intensive, stenographic course 

starting January 1. April 1, July 1. October I. 

Interesting Booklet sent tree, without obligation 

—write or phone. No solicitors employed. 

moser 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 

PAUL MOSER. J.D.. PH.B. 
Regular Courses, open to High School Grad- 
uates only, may be star ted any Monday. Day 
and Evening. Evening Courses open to men. 
116 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Randolph 4347 



Compliments of 

SOUTH SIDE 
CANDY CO. 

305 South Normal Parkway 
Phone Normal 6741 



S. Houston 
& Son 

Established 1883 

Fancy Fruits and Vegetables 

Poultry and Came of All Kinds 

GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Exclusive Purveyors to 

Hotels, Restaurants, Institutions, 

Clubs, Dining Cars, Steam Boats, 
Our Specialty 

157 South Water Market 

5 Trunk Lines: Phone Canal 7440 
We Ship Everywhere 



Phones Boulevard 0412-0413 

H. LANG & SON 

ARTIFICIAL ICE 

5208-10-12 Wentworth Ave. 

Plant: Acme Ice Company 

3604 W. 59th St. 



Page One Hundred Three 



Northwestern Photo-Engraving Co. 
Operating 24-hours Daily Har. 5062-3-4 



720 S.Dearborn St. 



Pickup and Delivery Anytime 



Compliments of 
A FRIEND 



Fred C. Krabbenhoft 


Wholesale Fish 


NORDIC DISTRIBUTOR 


Bus. Phones Radcliffe 1222-1223 


7838 So. Racine Avenue 


Chicago, III. 



NORMAL BOWLING 
HEADQUARTERS 

Crocombe's Woodlawn 
Recreation 

6225 Cottage Grove Avenue 



School Supplies 

Special Attention Given to 
Teachers' Orders 



GARDEN CITY 
EDUCATIONAL CO. 

529 South Wabash Ave. 



CONTINENTAL 
COFFEE CO. 

375 W. Ontario Street 
Whitehall 4633 



Hundred Fom 



REPRINTED FROM "NORMAL LIFE 1911." THE FIRST 
YEARBOOK AT NORMAL 

MR. HINKLE 



Comrades, listen to my tinkle, A "Lower |unior," I by fate 

Of this wondrous man named Hinkle, Experienced this in time but late, 

Dwells in room two hundred nine, A clever quiz did he devise, 

Second in the southwest line. With loss of weight to be the prize. 

Mathematics doth he teach. Of all his creed he gave, 

Interspersed with gospel speech, 'Twas little I did not save. 

And his human kindness overflows, For could I but repeat it all, 

For his answer all alone he knows. Thankfully my bulk should fall. 

Yea, his knowledge is so great Scientifically my system was wasted, 

To sequel it there is no "pate." While my mind of number tasted, 

Minds may with numbers labor, In my waking hours much augmented. 

Yet of his wisdom never savor. With the gas bill jumping unrelented. 



Thoughts of finding on my locker nailed, 
Semester's notice I had failed, 
To my brain, my conscience would not send, — 
The creed knew I, from end to end. 

The scale, with city sealer's stamp so true, 

Swore I weighed in pounds one-hundred-two; 

And the system praised I, loudly to the school room door, 

Horrors! I discovered then, I had not weighed myself before. 



*This poem is based on Mr. Hinkle's statement that pupils 
who could prove loss of weight in preparing for examinations 
would augment their mark for the same. 



PRACTICE PICTURE NATURAL HISTORY 

They call it a school A froggie would a-wooing go, 

And that's their story. And whom he wooed, he won; 

But me, I call it But he never knew 

An observatory. 'Til he was through 

All the work she'd done. 



PRACTICAL POLLYANNA I before a test I 

Out into the cold, cold world I pass, 
For I've been invited to "leave the class." 
In deep, deep disgrace I should feel I be, 
But, hurrah! — time to study Philosophy. 



Page One Hundred Fi 



To the Graduates: 

Best wishes for a happy and 
successful future. 



PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION 
Chicago Normal College 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



Page One Hundred Si 



AUTOGRAPHS 



Compliments of the Lower Senior Class 

Page Our Hundred Seven 



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Fisher Ice Cream Co 99 

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Krabbenhoft, Fred - 104 

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Lang and Son 103 

Marshall Studio 90 

Metropolitan Business College 94 

Miller's Fountain Lunch 99 

Moser Business College 103 

Northwestern Photo Engraving Co 104 

Normal College Lunch Room 96 

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Parent-Teachers' Association 106 

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South Side Candy Co 103 

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Page One Hundred Eight